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Clarissa's Blog

An academic's opinions on feminism, politics, literature, philosophy, teaching, academia, and a lot more.

Archive for the day “February 12, 2017”

Kids’ Play

Kids are the best. We had a group of kids between the ages of 3 and 9 at Klara’s party. They came up with a game where they’d be on a spaceship, exploring new planets. Our staircase would be the spaceship because it has a small gate for baby security. 

The kids arrived at a new planet (a.k.a. my reading room). The planet was called Klaraville and was ruled by Queen Klara. The kids gathered around Klara and pledged allegiance to her. She, of course, stared at them without having the slightest idea what they wanted but accepting the attention. The kids went on several space trips and reported back to the Queen every time. 

How they come up with such things I have no idea. 

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The Birthday 

We had an actual Indian buffet at home. Let’s see who can guess all the dishes!

I never got to try anything during the party; mostly because I had a new dress on and didn’t want to destroy it. 

The Accident of Birth

For centuries, nothing was more meaningful or more defining than whether one was born to a noble family. One’s entire existence was influenced in every single aspect by the accident of birth into a certain social class. 

After WWI, the titles of European nobility started to lose their value. Save for a couple of Windsors or Borbons, the rest of the “nobles” accepted that their titles’ place was on the trash heap of history. I’m sure it wasn’t pleasant for the antiquated aristocrats to see how “nobodies” were stripping them of importance but that’s the march of history for you. 

Today the same is happening with citizenship. And people are just as unhappy that the accident of birth that used to give them so much good stuff is becoming meaningless. Like the nobles of 100 years ago, they can’t believe that the lottery win they thought they had gained just by being born in the right place is losing its value. 

Of course, their loss is somebody else’s gain. Just like 100 years ago. 

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