A Good Quote from Hazony

Hazony discusses the double standard that reviles nationalist behavior by some countries and accepts it in others:

The Americans are reviled, and their behavior deplored, for exercising independent judgment in the pursuit of their interests as a nation, whereas no such scandal is attached to China or Iran exercising independent judgment and pursuing their own interests. Again, it is the national independence of a ‘European’ people that should have reached moral maturity and should know better that is driving the anger and hatred (216).

When a little kid announces, “Mommy, I’ve gone potty!” it’s cute and greeted with delighted applause. But if an adult does it, we find it disgusting. The liberal mentality, Hazony says, treats first-world countries like adults who should be too mature to engage in something as disgusting as acting in their own national interest. But when countries considered inferior do it, that’s OK because nobody holds them to the same high standard.

What’s really curious here is not the double standard, which is something we’ve all noticed many times. It’s the horrified repulsion of anything that smacks of defending national interest. People are trained to feel this repulsion because it brings enormous profits. To somebody else. They are schooled to cheer the dismantling of the nation-state that will make them poorer. But it’s OK because in return they get a sense of moral superiority.

What Hazony’s book misses is developing his ideas a bit further and taking them into the terrain of profits and gains. But he’s clearly not a Marxist, so for him it’s all ideas, Kant, morality, etc. I always find such an analysis insufficient but I fully recognize that other folks might see my obsession with the capital as boring and pedestrian.

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Book Notes: The Virtue of Nationalism, Part II

What is the liberal empire that is proposed as an alternative to nationalism like? Here is my favorite quote from Hazony’s book:

Dogmatic and utopian, it assumes that the final truths concerning mankind’s fate have long since been discovered, and that all that remains is a way to impose them. . . As the opponents of liberalism have been vanquished one by one, and universal liberal empire has seemed to come within reach, dogmatic imperialism [became] the dominant voice within the liberal camp – a voice that has rapidly taken on the worst features of the medieval Catholic empire upon which it is unwittingly modeled, including a doctrine of infallibility, as well as a taste for the Inquisition (46).

You can see from the style of writing why I liked this book in spite of disagreeing with a large chunk of the argument. Hazony tries to find roots of the modern nation-state in the Hebrew Bible, which I find kind of embarrassing in its sheer ludicrousness but this part I just quoted is spot-on and very powerful. I never thought about globalism this way but it makes a lot of sense to me. I hate authors who tell me what I already know because I feel like they are stealing my time. And I feared Hazony would be like that. But from the start, I discovered that the book was giving me new insights.

More to come later.

P.S. Isn’t it great to have me read all the hottest new books on nationalism and give reviews? This is a response to those who think that Humanities profs don’t contribute to the public good outside of teaching. This is also an argument against those who want to silence academics like me.

Book Notes: Yoram Hazony’s The Virtue of Nationalism, Part I

The greatest contribution of this book to the discussion of nationalism is that Hazony doesn’t refer to the alternative to nationalism with the vague terminology of globalism, transnationalism, or post-nation state. Instead, he uses the term “liberal imperialism,” which I haven’t encountered before but find productive and insightful.

There are many things I didn’t like about the book, such as, for instance, the obsessive and utterly unjustified attempts to link the rise of modern nationalism to the Protestant tradition. Nationalism is the child of the Enlightenment, and some of the greatest enlightened thinkers were French. It is no accident that the first grand success of nationalism was Napoleon’s mobilization of soldiers. And Napoleon’s greatest defeats happened when his used nationalism to advance imperialist goals and was rebuffed by nascent nationalisms in Spain, Russia, etc.

In any case, looking at nationalism as an alternative to imperialism (currently, of Germany in the EU, the US everywhere else, and, I’d add, Russia in Eastern Europe) is very productive and I don’t know that it’s been done by anybody else before.

People hate long posts, so I’ll break this one up in a bunch of smaller ones.

Subject to the Jurisdiction Thereof

Everybody sees things from their own perspective and based on their own experience. We all know that I’m a Russian-speaking immigrant, and that gives me some insight into the Russian-speaking aspects of different issues. That also skews my vision in this direction.

Rich Russian-speaking bastards come to the US to have babies and get them US passports. Rich, in the Russian-speaking parts of the world, means a total bastard and criminal every single time. Two minutes ago I went on FB (I’m at work, sitting at an event where I have nothing to do but skim the Internet) and stumbled across yet another utterly cynical and disgusting discussion by these rich baby tourists.

I see absolutely no good purpose being served by handing out US passports to these people who only want a foothold in the US to launder money, avoid criminal prosecution in the US, or engage in criminal activities. I also don’t see how they are “subject to the jurisdiction thereof” if they are not even fucking here. I had to wait 15 years for my passport while living here, paying taxes, being a responsible resident, not breaking any rules, and clearly being “subject to the jurisdiction thereof.” The only advantage these bastards have over me is that they are dirty rich. And they are rich because they robbed people like me blind, forcing some of us (although admittedly not me) to leave the country.

So how is it fair or good to reward them for their ill-gained profits? Yeah, there aren’t that many of them, blah blah. That’s not helping me feel the unfairness any less acutely. There is a whole industry catering to these folks who come not only from the FSU, obviously, but from everywhere. And they don’t tend to be good people for obvious reasons.

Good Suggestion

Finally:

Democrats Should Just Give Trump His Wall

Then get to work on what really matters.

The opposition to the wall has not been articulated in a logical and coherent way. There is currently no argument behind the opposition to the wall that is based on anything but dumb obstructionism. “It’s not going to work anyways,” which is why I don’t support it, is not an argument. It’s an emotion.

If nobody came up with such an argument in over two years, that must mean it doesn’t exist. Dumb obstructionism energizes the cuckoo wing but it’s energized already and is too small to win anything.

The Opioid Crisis Hasn’t Killed Enough People

Just what we need:

The Food and Drug Administration has approved a potent new opioid painkiller, despite warnings from physician critics who say the drug will contribute to the addiction epidemic.

And notice this:

On Wednesday, ahead of the FDA’s final decision, four U.S. senators — Ed Markey, Claire McCaskill, Joe Manchin and Richard Blumenthal — sent a letter to Gottlieb, the FDA’s commissioner, echoing concerns from Brown and Public Citizen and asking the agency to deny approval to Dsuvia until Brown and the full drug safety committee were allowed to participate.

I told you McCaskill is great. And so is Manchin. I hope they both win their races on Tuesday. But my question is: why just these four? Where is everybody else? Lying snugly in the pockets of the drug industry?

Please don’t vote for people until you see them take a firm stand on opioids.

NYTimes: Happy ‘National Jealousy Day’! Finland Bares Its Citizens’ Taxes

This is for those who convinced themselves that Scandinavian countries are some sort of a paradise. N wouldn’t have lasted a year in such a country. He already perceives annual visits to Sheryl, our accountant, as deeply invasive and painful. Having his financial business made public for the purposes of shaming and gossip is not something his would enjoy.

I have no problem with exposure but I do resent the ideological implications of this approach. I’ve heard many accounts of Ukrainians who arrive in Sweden and Norway and realize that busting their asses at work (and Ukrainians tend to be among the more high-aiming immigrants) is utterly useless because seniority is the only way to get promoted. Hey, why do you think Swedes were so welcoming to African and Middle Eastern immigrants in recent years? They know that immigrants are fucked without seniority and would always be an underclass.

The strong welfare state of the Scandinavian countries comes at the expense of any form of social and economic mobility. Even in Canada it’s worse than here in this sense.