Immigration Policy

This immigration policy proposal is definitely better than the insanity that currently exists and that seems designed with the sole goal of humiliating migrants and helping out organized crime, traffickers, and gangs.

Any immigration reform should start with establishing the goal of immigration. Without that, there will be a series of haphazard measures that undermine each other and create needless suffering.

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8 thoughts on “Immigration Policy”

  1. I’ve really learned in the past several months how dysfunctional our current immigration system is. Maybe I don’t agree with everything Cliff suggests, but it’s time we start talking solutions. What we’re doing now is just bizarre. Something needs to change.

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  2. Most of that would be an improvement, but I hate that the right is attacking birthright citizenship. Birthright citizenship is one of the things that the US does right and a country that attracts immigrants and doesn’t have it is setting itself up for big problems down the road.

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    1. The problem with birthright citizenship is birth tourism, for example (Clarissa has written on Russian birth tourism and why that is not a good thing)
      I have no problem with birthright citizenship for children born to those on immigration visas (or very easy to obtain in those cases).
      Birthright citizenship made sense at one time, it makes no rational sense (behind giving some people good feeelz) at present.

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      1. Birth tourism is a problem, but any changes to birthright citizenship need to be handled very carefully if we don’t want to have different problems down the road.

        My take on this is mostly informed by my time in Germany in the 90s when it was still extremely difficult for immigrants to obtain German citizenship. That was a huge problem in regards to assimilating immigrant populations. Lots of children of immigrants wound up angry and alienated as teens because they were barred from being full participants in the culture and society they had grown up in and they had no way to ever become part of it. There were also problems with children winding up stateless because Germany didn’t give them citizenship and the parents didn’t or couldn’t file the proper paperwork to claim citizenship in their country of origin. Being stateless is an incredibly shitty situation for the people who are stuck in it and not good for the society either. I fear the end of birthright citizenship would lead to more stateless people in the US.

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        1. I should add that there was a reform in 2000 that did a lot to fix this. It didn’t create full birthright citizenship, but children born in Germany to legal residents can claim German citizenship as long as they continue to live in Germany, go to school there, etc…

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          1. ” children born in Germany to legal residents can claim German citizenship as long as they continue to live in Germany, go to school there, etc…”

            That sounds much more reasonable than what Germany had prior to that or what the US has now. But it means ending birthright citizenship regardless.

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        2. “Lots of children of immigrants wound up angry and alienated as teens because they were barred from being full participants in the culture and society they had grown up in and they had no way to ever become part of it”

          Lots of them did grow up as full participants in German society, those that weren’t owe most of that status to their non-assimilating parents… (parents doing what they can to prevent their children from assimilating to the local society remains a huge problem with middle eastern immigration to Europe in general)

          “parents didn’t or couldn’t file the proper paperwork to claim citizenship in their country of origin”

          Yeah, feckless parents create massive problems for their children. There’s only so much the state can do to prevent that (and automatic citizenship is not necessarily the best solution…)

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