Another Win for Fluidity

And the nation-state loses once again:

On Tuesday a federal judge ruled the Trump administration could not add a question to the 2020 census about citizenship status.

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15 thoughts on “Another Win for Fluidity”

          1. The reason people object to a citizenship question on the Census is, briefly, that the Constitution requires that everyone be counted, not just citizens. A citizenship question means that people who may fear deportation because of their immigration status may try to avoid being counted in the census to avoid being caught. This will lead to an undercount, which will have problematic side effects.

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            1. “people who may fear deportation because of their immigration status ”

              The fact that there is apparently a significant number of such people is a signal that something has gone very wrong and should be dealt with, simply ignoring it won’t help anyone.

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              1. The fact that there is apparently a significant number of such people is a signal that something has gone very wrong and should be dealt with, simply ignoring it won’t help anyone.

                True. But forcing such people deeper underground will make this even worse. Reliable statistics are important.

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              2. These statistics are important in order to force taxpayers to subsidize the lifestyle of the rich. The rich underpay their illegal workers and offer them no benefits of job protections. The taxpayers get to pick up the slack by funding schooling, medical care, food stamps, etc for these exploited illegal workers. That’s why this census question is opposed. The rich don’t want us to know the extent to which they are robbing taxpayers.

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  1. It’s ridiculous that the U.S. court system has evolved over the decades to allow a single district judge to effectively make laws that are mandatory for the entire country. These rulings can be put into effect immediately if the judge so declares, and then it takes months for any appeal to work its way through the higher courts.

    Retired Justice Sandra Day O’Connor said in a whining interview a few years after her retirement that the Judicial Branch was “the most threatened branch of the U.S Government” and was “in severe danger.” She gave no hint as to who was doing the threatening or what the danger might be.

    In fact, the judiciary (at all levels) is by far the least threatened and least accountable branch of our government. Many judges are never elected, serve for life or very long tenures, and are virtually impossible to be held to account no matter how badly they perform their duties.

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  2. The democrats and progressives are aggressively pushing for an open border with Mexico and destroying the value of citizenship is just part of that.
    When it arise organically that’s not a bad thing – the Scandinavian countries have long had borders that are open with each other (facilitated by similar levels of socio-economic development and similar languages) but when it’s engineered (the 2004 EU expansion for example) it tends to create turbulence….

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    1. “the Scandinavian countries have long had borders that are open with each other
      (facilitated by similar levels of socio-economic development and similar languages)…”

      This situation hardly compares to most borders in modern history: Take the symbolic border between the sophisticated, highly educated seventeenth-century European colonists from Spain and England, and the third-century primitive savages of the indigenous native populations on the North and South American continents.

      One can see a similar chasm between the Israelis who have longed for peace with their Palestinian neighbors since the founding of Israel in 1948, and the Hamas/Hezbollah terrorists who seek only Israel’s destruction.

      In Western Europe, Angela Merkel threw open the door to the Muslim hordes, and is now reaping the whirlwind.

      The current situation on America’s southern border is perhaps a bit less melodramatic, but not by much.

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      1. “This situation hardly compares to most borders in modern history”

        True, borders tend to reveal collective differences (an idea that is intolerable to fluidity and it’s individual uber alles mentality)
        When the collective differences aren’t that great (Sweden/Norway) borders don’t make a huge amount of sense, when they are greater (Spanish enclaves in North Africa) they are needed.

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          1. Yeah I should add “when the cultures are close and neither side wants to absorb the other”…

            OT: do you have any idea what electronics culture is like in Ukraine? The last few times I’ve been at a local hypermarket the people huddling around the place where computer things like mice or flash drives and portable chargers are displayed are invariably speaking Russian as they earnestly compare things… maybe it’s for the bus ride?

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