Lancet

I’m confused. This Lancet diet thing sounds like a joke. But people seem to take it very seriously.

And no, it’s not a Mediterranean diet. It’s a total perversion of anything Mediterranean. I’m kind of offended on behalf of Mediterranean cultures and their usually great cuisines.

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10 thoughts on “Lancet”

    1. I’m looking at this report and I’m baffled at some of the serving sizes. Who the hell eats 1/5 of an egg in a single serving? I’m pretty sure I eat more dairy daily easily than this report allows for.

      Humans are omnivores.

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  1. As a medical doctor, my conscience compels me to respond to this nonsense! But hey, it’s 3:20 in the morning in Arizona, so I’m going to bed, and will write my wide-awake replay sometime tomorrow. Goodnight!

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    1. “The Lancet” is a legitimate, respected medical journal (I read it frequently when I was going through the internal medicine portion of my post-graduate medical training), but this “diet” report is bogus for a number of reasons:

      It fails to meet the basic criteria for any valid scientific research, which is to start with an unbiased viewpoint that doesn’t prejudge the outcome and then seek specific results in advance. Many of the contributors to this report have been pushing vegetarian diets for decades. The study itself was commissioned by leading vegan activist Gunhild A. Stordalen and the Seventh Day Adventist Church, which strongly encourages its members to eat a vegetarian diet, and in fact is a major commercial manufacturer of soy-based food substitutes.
      The diet is nutritionally deficient in several vitamins (B12, vitamin D, vitamin K2, and retinol) and essential minerals (iron, sodium, potassium, and calcium). Far from being unhealthy, red meat in moderate servings is the best source of certain vital nutrients. (If you actually followed this diet, you’d have to swallow half a dozen nutrient pills for dessert.)
      This “diet” report is attempting to combine two “apples and oranges” goals in one package: eating a healthy diet and saving the environment — both worthy goals, but you aren’t going to ward off climate change and improve the general physical state of the planet by putting the human race on an absurdly restrictive diet.

      This report should have been published in “The Onion.”

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      1. “The Lancet” is a legitimate, respected medical journal (I read it frequently when I was going through the internal medicine portion of my post-graduate medical training), but this “diet” report is bogus for a number of reasons:

        It fails to meet the basic criteria for any valid scientific research, which is to start with an unbiased viewpoint that doesn’t prejudge the outcome and then seek specific results in advance. Many of the contributors to this report have been pushing vegetarian diets for decades. The study itself was commissioned by leading vegan activist Gunhild A. Stordalen and the Seventh Day Adventist Church, which strongly encourages its members to eat a vegetarian diet, and in fact is a major commercial manufacturer of soy-based food substitutes.

        The diet is nutritionally deficient in several vitamins (B12, vitamin D, vitamin K2, and retinol) and essential minerals (iron, sodium, potassium, and calcium). Far from being unhealthy, red meat in moderate servings is the best source of certain vital nutrients. (If you actually followed this diet, you’d have to swallow half a dozen nutrient pills for dessert.)

        This “diet” report is attempting to combine two “apples and oranges” goals in one package: eating a healthy diet and saving the environment — both worthy goals, but you aren’t going to ward off climate change and improve the general physical state of the planet by putting the human race on an absurdly restrictive diet.

        This report should have been published in “The Onion.”

        Like

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