Another Local Murder Update

So the murder suspect turned out to be a 23-year-old guy called Zachary Capers. He has no connection to the victims that anybody has been able to found. Why he cut a peaceful old couple into ribbons is a mystery right now. The only connection is that Capers was homeless and the murdered lady did some charitable work with the homeless. He might have seen her there and singled her out for some reason.

He was charged so fast because he was picked up on an outstanding warrant shortly to the murders and was acting erratically, leading the police to look at his connection to the murders.

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Self-flagellation of Narcissists

They have lost their religion but the yearning for the sweet delights of public self-flagellation remains as strong as ever:

I’m a white Australian. I know that blaming myself and my cohort is illogical, but I can’t escape the feeling that all of white Australia is implicated in the deaths—a white majority that has fomented and let foment hate. Though he may have labeled himself a European, 28-year-old Brenton Tarrant was an Aussie through and through, growing up in a country town north of Sydney.

What pathetic, ridiculous creatures. Using a mass murder to revel in your moral superiority is beyond disgusting. This is narcissism of the worst order.

Local Murder Update

This is the couple murdered in my town yesterday:

Such a tragedy.

The police worked fast, and there is already a suspect in custody. Klara wasn’t at school today but other parents say there was no outside time at local daycares and schools. Which is a little over the top but we are a very low-crime town. Somebody asks for a couple of dollars by the Walmart, and it’s the news of the century.

SCOTUS Rules on Immigration

The Supreme Court on Tuesday adopted a strict interpretation of a federal immigration law, saying it required the detention of immigrants facing deportation without the possibility of bail if they had committed crimes, including minor ones, no matter how long ago they had been released from criminal custody.

What I don’t get is why immigrants who committed crimes aren’t deported immediately. What is this whole thing about “waiting for deportation cases to be resolved”? When N was almost deported – without commiting any crimes and while being in the country completely legally – we consulted a lawyer who said N had no case and should prepare to leave.

So what is it about deportation hearings? Green card holders who committed crimes, ok, maybe, although I’m opposed to that. But illegal immigrants and visa overstayers who commit crimes? Why should they stay when law-abiding, high-earning people like N or me are booted out immediately with no hearings?

I don’t get this system at all. If there were some logic behind it, I could disagree but I’d respect it. But I’m seeing no logic at all right now.

I Love Tenure

Being a tenured professor rocks! Going to a conference is a completely different experience. And I know I already said it but it bears repeating.

It used to be I’d go, give my talk, and then hide in my room for 3 days (which is something I love doing, so I’m not saying it to make people feel sorry for me).

Now, however, I have wall-to-wall meetings at the conference in DC where I’m going on Thursday. I’m meeting:

a) a scholar from Spain I always wanted to meet

b) a grad student I’m mentoring

c) the colleague I’ll be doing an edited collection with

d) a publisher for my book

e) a publisher for the edited collection

f) some people from my association

g) a student from India I’ve been mentoring.

It doesn’t look like hanging out in my room is on the cards. But this is super exciting. I’ve always wanted to be that person who has things to do at a conference besides just giving a talk. Tenure is a total game-changer. And I have no idea why because I never for a second worried I wouldn’t get it.

P.S. I’ve been torn between whether I should work on my own book or do an edited volume but I decided I can do both. In terms of articles, I already have 3 that will come out for sure in 2019, and it’s only March. Plus, I have two more awaiting decision and one almost finished. So it’s not like I’m creating a hole in my CV if I work on the edited volume this year. Now, is it shocking that people want me to be their research mentor? Not really.