Left and Right

Klara knows left and right. I only learned when I was seven. Even now I have to think about it every time.

“Mommy, this is left,” she says.

And I think, “This is the side I wear my Fitbit on. OK, it is left.”

By the way, does anybody know any child-appropriate knock-knock jokes? I want to teach some to Klara because I read it’s an important milestone.

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17 thoughts on “Left and Right”

  1. One of the first knock-knock jokes I learned, according to my mom:

    Knock knock.
    Who’s there?
    Banana.
    Banana who?

    Knock knock.
    Who’s there?
    Banana.
    Banana who?

    Knock knock.
    Who’s there?
    Banana.
    Banana who?

    Knock knock.
    Who’s there?
    Orange.
    Orange who?
    Orange you glad I didn’t say banana?

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  2. Okay, I’ve got three right or left questions for you:

    Which hand do you and N hold your fork in when you eat?

    Are either of you left-handed?

    Do you know what your fork preference demonstrates?

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  3. “In company we use the left hand but that’s only because we have to.”

    WHY do you “have to” in company??

    I asked the original questions to see how Americanized you’d become. Most of the right-handed European immigrants that I know keep their their fork in their left hand throughout the meal, simply because that’s how they were taught growing up in Europe.

    Most right-handed Americans switch hands with their knife and fork, depending on whether they’re eating or cutting. That’s too much trouble!

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    1. Because we have to be pretentious and use knives in company. I still can’t believe anybody would do it of their own free will and not to be pretentious.

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      1. Ah, I get it — you can’t safely handle a knife in your left hands! (Lefties like me quickly learn how to cut with our right hand, while we shovel the food in with our left. You can eat much faster that way.)

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          1. “We don’t need knives at all. 🙂 ”

            This saga gets curiouser and curiouser. Assuming that you sometimes eat meat that hasn’t been pre-cut into small pieces for a stew (like the steaks grilled on your George Foreman), how do you get it into pieces small enough to skewer with a fork without a knife??

            Any videos of your mealtimes? 🙂

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              1. “You spear it with the fork, lift it up to your mouth, bite off a piece, and plonk it back on the plate.”

                If you eat turkey drumsticks like that, you must have muscular arms! I hope you switch hands during the meal so that both biceps develop equally.

                Dining etiquette hint: the fastest way to eat chopped-up salads is with chopsticks. Ask the waiter for them when you eat out.

                Liked by 1 person

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