Montessori

Has anybody tried Montessori schools? I found an affordable one close by. Are they worth it?

By affordable I mean 40% less than daycare.

I’m not looking for right now but for when she turns 5 and primary school begins.

12 thoughts on “Montessori”

  1. Have had wonderful experiences with first a private then public Montessori. They encourage the development of children’s autonomy and natural curiosity. Less or no institutional busy work/testing for bureaucratic reasons. They incorporate real world household skills (how to pour liquid, how to sweep). The child self directs through different activities, called “work”. These are puzzles, scaled math games etc. All in different stations, and the children learn how to use the work stations, return to original state and pick up after themselves. Above all they respect children and their natural desire to learn. Highly recommend this effective pedagogy.

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    1. Ok, this sounds amazing. It’s just the kind of pedagogy I like. Do they do a lot of physical activity / outside time? I’m a little obsessed with physical activity.

      What age did your kid start there?

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      1. Yes, they generally have a lot of outdoor time and emphasis movement and development. My child started as an 18 month old (now 5), and has thrived at both schools. It is true, as another points out, that many people use the name “Montessori” with varying levels of adherence to the full pedagogical philosophy. My child attended two very thoroughly Montessori schools. It’s a good sign if they’re affiliated with formal Montessori training programs.

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      2. Yes, they generally have a lot of outdoor time and emphasis movement and development. My child started as an 18 month old (now 5), and has thrived at both schools. It is true, as another points out, that many people use the name “Montessori” with varying levels of adherence to the full pedagogical philosophy. My child attended two very thoroughly Montessori schools. It’s a good sign if they’re affiliated with formal Montessori training programs.

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  2. We had our kid in a Montessori when she was 2 through 5. It worked amazingly well for her. A word of warning: “Montessori” is not a standardized designation. Basically any place can call themselves a Montessori, and lots of variations exist (from “not actually Montessori at all” to lots of hybrids, etc.). Things to look for: early childhood educators with Montessori qualifications, lots of Montessori learning materials, and a dedicated “work” period for the children to explore these materials. More here: https://amshq.org/About-Montessori/What-Is-Montessori/Core-Components-of-Montessori. My kid’s classroom had “work” time in the morning (for 2-3 hours daily, tiny children quietly focussing, you could hear a pin drop and it was amazing) and outside playtime in the afternoon, which was a good mix for us.

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  3. I’m grateful towards my mother (my father would have done it, but I didn’t want it and my mother stepped up) not succumb to the tentation of sending me to a private school; that taught me valuable lessons about variety of people, how to defend against bullies, and many crucial social skills that I would have never learnt if I would have gone to a private rich school.

    But if Klara wants to go to a private school, Montessori is a good idea. (In Québec City, we have École Vision who’s even better)

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    1. I’m just so scared of these stories people tell me about tons of idiotic homework and almost no recess in the local public elementary, you know? I don’t give a crap about academics because I can teach her everything and more on the elementary school level. She already can find St Louis, Montreal and Lima on the globe. And she knows what synonyms are. And she knows not only upper case but lower case letters. I’m a professional educator and I rock. But when I hear “no recess,” I get scared and panicky.

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      1. The “no recess” is horrible, I agree.

        About homeworks, my homeworks were almost always done at the end of the class when I was at primary and high school. (And that became a problem for me later, since I developed no work ethic until the end of M. Sc. I still pay the price today, since they don’t believe that I have changed)

        Of course, you and me could homeschool our kids without any problems.

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  4. My daughter goes to public Montessori and they go outside every day the weather permits. Even in winter. The teachers remind us to send changes of clothes, snowboots etc for this reason. There is a courtyard the primary classrooms have access to and kids are free to come and go to the courtyard to do their work if they please. They do window washing and other like work outside. They also have recess daily and are allowed to go to the gym with a friend if they so choose. We are so glad we decided to send her there. I would go and take a tour of the school if you are able!

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  5. I went to a Montessori school for a few months when I was quite small, so I cant remember much about it except I was happy there. We did a lot of dancing and spent time outdoors in an orchard. Then we moved house, to a different part of the planet and I went to an army school, so that was that .

    From looking into it when my kids were small I think these schools can vary a lot, so go in and check it out. See what you think, and what Klara thinks. I couldn’t afford to send my three.

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