Class Resentment

People will say, like they said about the Iraq War, that everyone just let this happen. They’ll say it to let themselves off the hook — nobody ELSE was protesting, so I didn’t do it either — but the work these young men and women are doing should not be erased.

Actually, I’ll say that a bunch of dumb rich kids are entertaining themselves in dumb rich kid ways. I have a lot of class resentment towards this kind of people.

16 thoughts on “Class Resentment”

  1. Well, today is unpleasant (for) Jews day to me. First, I read about “Jessica Yaniv, born Jonathan Yaniv” (a Jew) who seems to be a sexual harasser of teen girls in addition to leaving adult working-class women without their jobs with lawsuits, making any normal human being want to spit at him at the least. Haven’t found whether he has Israeli citizenship but the name is fully Israeli.

    Then, I read about “Never Again Action, a brand-new movement of young American Jews calling for Immigration and Customs Enforcement to be shut down.” Never Again is a slogan we use in Israel to say Never Again will Jews be powerless as our people had been during WW2. Our weapons and determination to protect our borders will let us survive and continue thriving despite our neighbors. I hate when Holocaust is degraded in this fashion, let alone by Jews themselves.

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    1. When I was a very recent immigrant, I hated this type of young people to the point where I shook with rage and had hypertensive episodes. Now I’m calmer but I still find them to be very disgusting. Spoiled, ridiculous little dweebs.

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  2. Well, I never liked Meir Kahane and the point of “never again” is not that this was an exception, something unrepeatable, uniquely bad and so on. And before you start saying I could not know, remember that most of my family on one side was killed in Poland in the early 1940s.

    I don’t see why college students / college students with money shouldn’t do this. There are kids in cages in the USA and these college students have the time to protest, so good — somebody’s got to, I’ve only had time to go to one march and write a few letters, haven’t even gone up to any of my local camps to offer translation services yet. Anything anyone can do is welcome, so far as I am concerned.

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    1. Absolutely they should. I’m very glad they’ve had such sheltered, cute lives, I honestly am. Paradoxically, they always end up more depressed, miserable and medicated than people like me who worked four minimum wage jobs at their age. So we end up having our revenge against our rich peers after all. :-))

      The mechanisms of this process are an absolute mystery to me. But it always works out this way.

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        1. Protesting detention centers in favor of what? What is their alternative proposal? More detention centers to avoid crowding? Better funding for detention centers? Immediate closure of all detention centers?

          The “Baba Yaga is against” type of protests I do not support.

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          1. Not detain. We’ve only been doing it since 80s, ramping up in 90s. It has to do with the private prison contracts — this is the period in which we started sending massive numbers of USians to jail for things that formerly weren’t considered to warrant it. Seriously, these things can be worked out.

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    2. // Well, I never liked Meir Kahane

      Who talked about this man?!!!

      I cannot stand this racist who “supported the restriction of Israel’s democracy to its Jewish citizens, hoped that Israel would eventually adopt Jewish religious law” and tried to pass laws which would “forbid sexual relations between non-Jews and Jews, and end cultural meetings between Jewish and Arab students.” The political party he founded Kach (a radical Orthodox Jewish, ultranationalist political party) was banned in 1988 by the Israeli government for being “racist” and “anti-democratic.” The Anti-Racist Law of 1988 was passed specifically because of his party to unsure such ideas are kept away from Israeli government. [wiki]

      I am sensitive to this since mentioning Kahane the moment anyone mentions Zionism is a widespread tactic to delegitimize Israel’s right to exist, equating Zionism with racism. Only yesterday I read an article about the insult “Zio” and “Jeremy Corbyn’s Anti-Semitic Labour Party.”

      // the point of “never again” is not that this was an exception, something unrepeatable, uniquely bad and so on.

      Different people define “the point” differently, and I would not expect non-Jews far away from the Middle East living in a completely different reality assign the same meanings as we Israeli Jews do. However, I do expect non-Israeli Jews think for a while before exploiting and cheapening Holocaust thus. And, since “never again” is a Jewish-Israeli slogan, the meaning we assign is the one that counts for me.

      Also, we in Israel do not think Holocaust is “something unrepeatable”. For instance, Arabs tried to prevent the foundation of Israel and had they succeeded, Middle East today would’ve been Jew-free and thousands of Jews would’ve been killed. Precisely because we have many enemies, we need to protect ourselves.

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      1. Kahane was an extremist, not a representative Zionist. But in my memory was the one who most used the never again slogan in a militaristic sense. Others, including other famous Israelis, not all left wing, have used it more universally.

        I know some people don’t think the detention camps we have here, are problematic but I’d say than even if not (and I think they are) they’re worth watching. The concentration/starvation camp is something US was good at doing in the 19th C, and remember the mass Nazi killings didn’t happen until after the possible opposition had been liquidated. Personally, I would say watching out and protesting is in the spirit of self defense.

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        1. \ Kahane was an extremist, not a representative Zionist. But in my memory was the one who most used the never again slogan in a militaristic sense. Others, including other famous Israelis, not all left wing, have used it more universally.

          I am unsure what you mean by “more universally.”

          I do not follow politics closely, was a small child and was not even yet in Israel when Kahane was assassinated in 1990. However, I’ve always assumed the never again slogan is used in Israel as a point to stress the importance of the existance of the nation state for the Jewish people, not in an universal meaning referring to other peoples in the world. Of course, it’s different for Americans and for some American Jews based on what I read here.

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          1. So you missed Kahane, you’re lucky. He was a US guy, you know, at least partly and he used to visit at my university (Berkeley), give talks, etc., so I’ve even seen him. Never again, he made the slogan his and wrote a book by that title in 1972 that makes it a defense-of-Israel slogan, basically. I’d always heard it as never-again genocide / prison camps / torture, which is what I mean by more universal. It was controversial when the high school students in Florida used it about school shootings, though — people said school shootings should not be compared to Holocaust.

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            1. I have no idea who this Kahane fellow is but “never again” is absolutely about Holocaust and it’s very offensive to use it in any other context. For instance, I wouldn’t be ok with it being used to talk about Holodomor or Stalinist genocides. Using it in comparatively trivial contacts – like these rich kids are doing – is completely out there. I understand the youthful rebelliousness of overgrown thirty-year-olds but there’s got to be a limit.

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              1. So you don’t approve of the Latin American never again movements — Netanyahu using it about the Rwanda genocide — etc.? Here’s something about Kahane’s deployment (I’d have said appropriation) of the term, which is very militaristic and Holocaust – specific. The same article talks about how Netanyahu uses now it to help argue for a strong Jewish state, but in a different way than Kahane did — https://www.jpost.com/Diaspora/Never-Again-From-a-Holocaust-phrase-to-a-universal-phrase-544666

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  3. Z, I read the article you linked. Yes, Netanyahu wrote those words in the guestbook “after visiting a memorial to the victims of the Rwanda genocide in 2010.” However, Israeli Jews and Netanyahu himself in Israel pretty much never use this phrase except in the particular sense, when we talk “about the need for a strong Jewish state in the wake of the Holocaust.”

    May be, 5% of Israeli Jewish population who are very Left-wing sometimes use it in an universal sense. I don’t know.

    The US Holocaust Memorial Museum uses the phrase also in the universal sense since it tries to attract non-Jews. That’s why its workers chose “the name Never Again as the theme of its 2013 Days of Remembrance, its used the term as a call to study the genocide of the Jews in order to respond to the “warning signs” of genocides happening anywhere.”

    In Israel, it’s 100% Holocaust – specific sense. Also, you use the term “very militaristic,” but is stressing the importance of having a strong Jewish state with a strong army in Israeli situation wrong? Why? We have states like Syria as neighbors and millions of Muslims would be glad to have a Jew-free Middle East. Those are facts. Why shouldn’t we take care to protect ourselves?

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    1. I think is the universal sense is fine, and useful, and makes the right point. I’m glad to be aware of this military / national security connotation, though.

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