Curious Regional Accent

Which regional accent is it when a person says “Mon-dee” and “Tues-dee” for days of week?

I’m talking about a native speaker of English. An ultra-educated person.

12 thoughts on “Curious Regional Accent”

    1. The first syllable is accented in most words where I grew up, including these. BTW, your post is cliff arroyo. I thought you meant that the second syllable being accented is normal American, but maybe you meant your second option, MUN-dee.

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        1. I think you maybe noticed that pronunciation before, it’s not really rare. Personally I say Monday etc when the word is stressed but am likely to say Mondee in the middle of a sentence.

          Here are some dialect maps.

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  1. “Which regional accent is it when a person says “Mon-dee” and “Tues-dee” for days of week?”

    Well, I never thought about it my entire long life until you asked the question. But when I listen closely to how I speak, the weekdays come out a bit closer to “MON-dee” than to “MON-day.”

    So I guess I still have a trace of a Southern accent.

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  2. The people I have known who say that are also from Tennessee or Kentucky. My sainted friend Bill tells the riddle of his birth: “I was born in the same house same bedroom same bed as my brother a few years later, but I was born in Tennessee and he was born in Kentucky. How does that work?”

    The answer is: they moved the bed from one side of the bedroom to the other side of the bedroom -and the cabin was built on the state line .

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    1. “they moved the bed from one side of the bedroom to the other side of the bedroom -and the cabin was built on the state line .”

      So did they say “Mondee” on the Tennessee side of the room, and “Monday” on the side that didn’t secede but fought for the Union?

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  3. The pronunciation you mention -ˈmʌndi in the IPA spelling – used to be standard Received Pronunciation among British educated speakers well into the 1980s. The other pronunciation, with the -day suffix pronounced as the word “day”, used to be looked down upon as crass and vulgar. But then came the Internet and all the rest of it and the second pronunciation gained ground since it was standard American. I still stick to the educated norm of RP, as does the Queen of England: ˈmʌndi.

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