Crazee in Melbourne

Stage 4 restrictions are now in place for Melbourne.
Exercise is limited to once a day for 1 hour.
Shopping is limited to 1 person once a day.
And when doing either, you must stay within 5kms of your home.
You must also stay home between 8pm and 5am. https://t.co/AB1pmyoV7u

Because virus spreads better at 8:05 than at 7:55. And those bastards who exercise for 90 minutes a day are superspreaders. I always knew there was something wrong with those smug bastards.

40 thoughts on “Crazee in Melbourne”

  1. // Because virus spreads better at 8:05 than at 7:55.

    Because those are the hours in which most people shop, sit in cafes and restaurants, go to pubs, and so on.

    We also had similar restrictions. On Saturdays and holidays we could not exit house at all for a while since holidays usually are the time of mass gatherings.

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  2. Remember how money from “defund police” was supposed to go to education, with some teachers’ unions being very enthusiastic? Imagine teachers’ faces when “Defund history teachers” becomes the newest slogan. 🙂 🙂 Btw, I haven’t known your state was so woke.

    Here:

    //The end of history in Illinois
    State Rep. La Shawn K. Ford wants the subject abolished

    Demanding education reform is something of an American political tradition … But even after six-plus decades of enthusiastic reform, an Illinois Democrat has found a way to be original. On Sunday night, State Rep. La Shawn Ford delivered the well-trod complaint that history classes focus too much on the achievements of white men.

    Ford added that until the new curriculum can be designed, Illinois history classes should be abolished. That is not a joke; Cockburn is not having a jolly jest at the expense of The Spectator’s readers. The news release from Ford’s own office is quite literally titled ‘Rep. Ford Today in Evanston to Call for the Abolishment of History Classes in Illinois Schools.’ Until Ford is satisfied with how the past is presented, it is best for schoolchildren to pretend the past does not exist at all.

    In fact, Cockburn can’t help but speculate that Ford may have made his demand without bothering to look at the state’s existing textbooks, or its existing laws. Ford’s official statement laments that ‘current history teaching practices overlook the contributions by Women and members of the Black, Jewish, LGBTQ communities and other groups.’ But just last year, the Illinois legislature passed a bill requiring that all public schools teach students about the historical contributions of gay, bisexual, and transgender people. In fact, Ford voted for it. And Illinois has already required black history in schools since 1991; a bill passed just last year expands that mandate to the state’s public colleges. Illinois was also the first state in America to mandate Holocaust education.

    https://spectator.us/the-end-of-history-in-illinois/

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    1. That’s the first time I heard there are history classes in Illinois. For all the good they do, they can easily be abolished with nobody noticing.

      The way the Holocaust is taught is downright shameful. It’s taught outside of any context. Students end up thinking that it’s an isolated instance of sudden, inexplicable craziness. Every year I discover that students are stunned to find out that anti-Semitism didn’t start or end with the Holocaust. Or that the Holocaust isn’t a single instance of anti-Jewish persecution. Or that there’s any connection between the Holocaust and Israel being created as a state. Or, as one student put it, “it’s the same Jews in Israel and in the Holocaust! Wow, it’s crazy I never heard of it!”

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      1. // That’s the first time I heard there are history classes in Illinois. For all the good they do, they can easily be abolished with nobody noticing.

        At least, the students know that the Holocaust was an extreme case of “anti-Jewish persecution.”

        They heard words such as “Puritans,” “WW2” and “Great Depression.”

        You have something to build on, not only “the world was created in 6 days, and we have been living here in the greatest country on Earth ever since, together with the dinosaurs as shown in a (creationist) museum.”

        Besides, remember a post I linked of an American criticizing his school history lessons by listing what they learned? You said they learned a lot after reading what was supposed to be a criticism.

        Since many of your students are first generation in college, you may meet the worst cases from inderfunded, overcrowded inner city schools. What can be learned in two hours per week in a bad school?

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        1. Please, I beg you, enough with the “underfunded schools.” It’s a total myth.

          It’s actually easier to teach people who are a blank slate than those who have been taught garbage because you have to waste a ton of time disputing the garbage. I had a much easier time with students who never heard of the indigenous civilizations of the Americas than those who have been indoctrinated into the religion of Howard Zinn.

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          1. // Please, I beg you, enough with the “underfunded schools.” It’s a total myth.

            Don’t schools in poor areas receive much less funding and have more students in classes?

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            1. “In 2016, the United States spent $13,600 per full-time-equivalent (FTE) student on elementary and secondary education, which was 39 percent higher than the average of Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) member countries of $9,800 (in constant 2018 U.S. dollars).”

              It really isn’t about money.

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              1. // 39 percent higher than the average of Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)

                I checked and on Quora “Bob Geier, U.S. citizen and former public official” talked about this seeming contradiction. Even if some reasons he gives are true, this may explain matters :

                // First, many urban and rural school districts don’t have high property values on which to base a tax. Those communities simply can’t afford to fully fund schools.

                Some people here point out that in OECD reports the U.S. ranks high on school spending. That’s true, but what it fails to consider is that U.S. schools have many, many more expenses than schools in other OECD countries.

                We don’t have universal health care in the U.S., so schools have high health care costs for teachers.

                We are highly litigious in the U.S., so costs for insurance and legal expenses are much higher.

                School capital expenses in the U.S. are debt financed, so the schools owe principle and interest payments on school buildings that are incorporated into the OECD figures. Most OECD countries don’t handle capital costs in this way.

                Most OECD countries don’t offer school busing or at least not as comprehensive a busing program as the U.S. Our school busing costs are extremely high.

                Most OECD countries don’t offer school sports and extracurricular activities at anywhere near the level we do. These are very expensive, in operational costs, insurance, and facilities.

                Most OECD countries have a lower cost of living.

                Most OECD countries have larger school districts. In the U.S. they are very small, often merely hundreds of students. This leads to a lot of duplication of resources and waste, but “local schools” have a strong cultural history here.

                Most OECD countries offer day care and other youth programming for children outside the schools. In the U.S., schools are the primary day care facility for parents. As a result, there is pressure for schools to run program for the whole day, where many OECD countries have shorter real school days and therefore less personnel expense.

                In most OECD countries, schools aren’t confronted with the same sorts of parental and youth behavioral challenges as in the U.S., and teachers are accorded greater professional respect. That has broken down in many places in the U.S., and leads to higher costs in added administration, teacher aides, etc. as well as difficulty attracting or retaining competent teachers.

                Schools are run by elected school boards (low-level politicians) in the U.S. whose members typically don’t have any background or experience in education. Boards have high turnover. This leads to poor strategic planning and often weak financial oversight. Schools are approached by and often support a number of for-profit private contractors of dubious value; in some cases there is outright corruption.

                https://www.quora.com/Why-are-schools-in-America-underfunded

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              2. …and there are plenty of perfectly ordinary private, parochial-type schools that can do the job for $10k or less per child. Educational quality is hit-or-miss, but generally above average compared to public schools… largely because they have the advantage of being able to kick out students who don’t want to be there. I have no idea why we can’t do all-private schools, with low-income voucher subsidies. They’d come with their own problems, but not worse problems. And they’d cost less.

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      2. Wait, why are you mentioning Holocaust in your lessons? Spanish Jews were not in it. Checked wiki and it seems Spain had no Jews for quite a while until the end of WW2.

        Do you teach not only Spanish history?

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        1. It usually comes up when I talk about the expulsion of the Jews from Spain in 1492. Somebody always says, “wait, is that the same Jews as in the Holocaust??? So the hatred against them already existed long before Hitler?” And then I have to trace the whole historical trajectory starting all the way back in the Roman Empire. The effect is that of a bomb exploding because students finally put things in context and start to get it.

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      3. They also don’t know that concentration camps did not originate with Hitler and the Nazis. Britain used concentration camps against the Boers in South Africa during the Boer War. Due to their inability to defeat the Boer guerillas, known as commandos, the British adopted a strategy of total war against the Boer people as a whole in order to cut off support for the commandos and force the Boers to surrender.

        Germany expanded on this tactic during the Herero genocide in their neighboring colony of German South West Africa (Namibia). The most infamous death camp was Shark Island concentration camp where the Germans used the Hereros as slave labor and conducted medical experiments claiming to prove that black Africans were racially inferior to Europeans.

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  3. Btw, have you heard of Putin’s coronavirus vaccine and the goal of making 60% Russians take it? As I understood, soldiers had already been given it. The next target is teachers. One of my cousins in Russia is a teacher, and my mother is extremely against him agreeing to any vaccines.

    According to Putin’s own words, if one reads between the lines, significant side effects should be expected.

    Who knows what pointless and poisonous garbage they’ll put in it. 😦

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  4. ““In 2016, the United States spent $13,600 per full-time-equivalent (FTE) student”

    Found a potentially interesting educator and author Jonathan Kozol. In 2005, he published “The Shame of the Nation: The Restoration of Apartheid Schooling in America.”

    Wiki says about the funding:

    “In the book, Kozol attacks the disparity in expenditures on education between central cities and well-to-do suburbs, and the system of property taxes which most school systems and states rely on for funding. He expresses outrage at inequities in expenditure, pointing out that New York City in 2002-3 spent $11,627 on the education of each child, while in Nassau County, the town of Manhasset spent $22,311, and Great Neck $19,705. He found that there are comparable disparities in other metropolitan areas, since most funding is locally based. Kozol describes schools that are separated by a 15-minute drive but that offer vastly different educational opportunities. In one example, a primarily white school offers drama club and AP classes, and the nearby primarily black school requires classes like hairdressing.”

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    1. Still… when I was in a private high school, the tuition was $6k/yr. The education wasn’t spectacular, but it wasn’t bad either and most of us went to college. Why is it that an ordinary Presbyterian church in my podunk hometown can educate kids decently for $6k/yr, but NYC can’t even manage basic literacy on more than $11k/yr? It’s not about funding (or if it is, we should abolish paid school boards). I mean, granted it’s been a while since I was in school, but a cursory search of our local private schools with decent reputations… still 8-10k. Which means the crappiest school districts in the country could probably give their kids a better education by simply handing the money over to the kids, to spend at the school or educational program of their choice.

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      1. “Which means the crappiest school districts in the country could probably give their kids a better education by simply handing the money over to the kids, to spend at the school or educational program of their choice.”

        No “probably” about it.

        Competition in the education sector is always good for consumers. State-protected monopolies in primary and secondary schools, along with the vested interests that feed at their table – bureaucrats and teacher unions – always argue that more tax money in their pockets is the answer to any and all the problems they themselves have created.

        In the college and university system, students carry various types of state subsidies with them to spend as they please. Healthy competition for student-bums-on-seats is good for the system as a whole. If the parents of primary and secondary school students could spend the state subsidies designated for their children as they wished it would crush the state sector monopolists and they know it and fear it more than anything.

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    2. New York has some kind of statewide money redistribution for schools. Within the gargantuan NYC school district which has 70,000 students PER GRADE, they pay $26,000 per student and funding is equalized throughout the city. Only difference is poor schools get extra $$ from the Fed while nonpoor schools depend on PTA to pay for music, art, drama classes. Quite a bit of the 26K goes to pensions.

      The bloated central administration has probably dozens of levels of micromanagement in between the schools and the chancellor. No economies of scale there. And there is no elected school board to give accountability to parents. And the results are disastrous. I think a third or more of black and Hispanic children do not meet grade standards in English and math.

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  5. // … largely because they have the advantage of being able to kick out students who don’t want to be there.

    From which age should the answer be kicking students out instead of making effort to teach them somewhere?

    Till what age should education be compulsory?

    // I have no idea why we can’t do all-private schools, with low-income voucher subsidies. They’d come with their own problems, but not worse problems. And they’d cost less.

    All-private schools, all-private medicine, all-private police, all-prive …

    Is the solution truly the privatization of everything? Who will control what students are taught in all private school system? Should students receive subsidies to attend schools teaching creationism?

    We discussed the elimination of public welfare in post – nation state age, won’t your offer lead to even worse inequality?

    ‘Re-imagine police’ seems to mean ‘defund the police’, so only rich people will enjoy any security in gated communities.

    Your offer sounds like easily leading to a similar ‘re-imagining’ of education.

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    1. This discussion is interesting but it doesn’t make much sense in the current situation. Public schools are refusing to educate kids.

      I’m hearing that people have started to organize “learning pods” where several kids are brought together and a parent or an acquaintance who is qualified in the field of, say, math or literature comes to teach them. This is a highly effective model. Of course, it’s only for the families who have the intellectual and mental resources to do it. But that’s always true.

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      1. // Public schools are refusing to educate kids.

        For small kids till age of 10 at the least, schools are opening worldwide, including in Israel.

        The Federalist says schools will reopen and Democratic politicians are already changing what they say on this matter:

        // Why Democrats Have Started To Cave On Reopening Schools
        The pressure to reopen schools is on everywhere now that New York is doing it. This means something else big: Their hard opposition to school reopenings is politically devastating for Democrats.

        on Friday, Cuomo cleared schools to open this fall … That same day, New York Sen. Chuck Schumer, the Senate’s minority leader, joined the Democrat messaging reversal: “If we don’t open up the schools, you’re going to hurt the economy significantly.”

        House Speaker Nancy Pelosi tucked the posture shift into a Saturday response to Trump’s latest executive orders, saying “these announcements do…nothing to reopen schools,” as if Democrats have been all along supporting school reopenings instead of the opposite.

        Reopening … means the below-surface financial and political pressure Cuomo, Pelosi, and Schumer are under to make this kind of a reversal must be huge. It’s likely coming from not only internal polling but also early information about just how many people have left New York and New York City, as well as interpersonal intelligence from their influential social circles.

        https://thefederalist.com/2020/08/11/why-democrats-have-started-to-cave-on-reopening-schools/

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    2. You are talking to the wrong person when it comes to compulsory education. I homeschool my own kids. My (mercifully brief) experience of the local public schools was that they were worse than getting no schooling at all– they were actively damaging. My siblings’ experiences (they spent far more time in the public system than I did) generally confirms this. I don’t believe schooling should be compulsory, and I firmly believe that apprenticeships and other real-world learning opportunities should be available to children from a fairly early age– maybe 9 or 10.

      The kids who’d get kicked out: people get far too hung up on those kids. They’re failing in regular, compulsory school. Some of them could probably make good, with a hands-on apprenticeship type learning. But we’re denying them the chance to try it, and basically giving them up to criminal activity and jail instead, because regular school doesn’t work for them. Some kids can’t be educated. There are a lot of reasons for that, but it doesn’t make sense to condemn everyone else to crap schooling in an attempt to save those kids.

      When the system you have isn’t working, you need more options, not more of the same thing. What if we could take that school tax money, and instead of building a school system with it, just set up an education savings account for every kid– like an HSA but for schooling. It could be used for tuition, books, tutors, lessons…

      My kids are years ahead of public school education standards, and we do it on a budget of… probably less than $500/yr for books, materials, field trips, etc. That does not, of course, include the loss of my potential income, but… once you spread out the cost over three kids, it’s very economical compared to the $$$ it takes for public schools to damage children while not educating them. It’d be nice if I could be reimbursed that property-tax money, for the education of my children. Then we could afford a language tutor, music lessons, dance classes, and who knows what else? Heck, I could afford to send them to the same little protestant school I attended, knowing they’d get a reasonably good general education, and I could go back to work!

      Would some kids get a poor education? Yes. That’s the wrong question. Some kids have crap parents. Some kids had mothers who were binge drinkers or meth-heads while pregnant. There is no amount of schooling that can fix that. The right question is: Would more children be educated poorly if we tried something different, or would fewer children be educated poorly? I tend to think it’s the latter.

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      1. // My (mercifully brief) experience of the local public schools was that they were worse than getting no schooling at all– they were actively damaging.

        What was damaging: the lack of imparted knowledge, the bullying from other students or something else?

        I ask since both my brother and I went to usual public schools in Ukraine and then in Israel, and it had been a very positive experience, allowing us to succeed in university later. I loved going to school and wouldn’t receive normal socialization without that experience.

        If some American public schools are as bad as you describe, worse than a school in a small town in Ukraine after FSU fell apart and bandit wars of the 90ies were raging, then a serious reform is necessary.

        // it doesn’t make sense to condemn everyone else to crap schooling in an attempt to save those kids.

        Agree. There are special programs for teens at risk in Israel. The services have to be public since the kids’ parents often cannot be relied upon.

        // That does not, of course, include the loss of my potential income, but… once you spread out the cost over three kids, it’s very economical compared to the $$$

        So, it’s not economical for YOU, after all, and costs (potentially more than a hundred of) thousands instead of $500/yr.

        Most parents cannot afford not to work in order to educate kids. For smaller kids, schools function as a babysitting service too. As for older kids, it is much harder to truly study alone in an organized fashion at home than at school. It is extremely hard even for university students. That’s why fully online diplomas are not equal quality-wise to usual university attendance.

        The moment a parent starts spending money on numerous tutors in most subjects, the costs will rise fast.

        I do not know about kids with special needs, but for average kids, average schools do provide a quite good service from my experience of somebody from a family of teachers. Of course, there are bad schools (and bad private schools designed for weak students expelled from public schools or failing there) , but in Israel if a parent makes an effort a normal public school may be found.

        Besides, schooling is not only about math. It’s about having friends and developing an identity away from the parent’s gaze.

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        1. //What was damaging: the lack of imparted knowledge, the bullying from other students or something else?//

          Yes on all counts. I learned nothing in my time there. I had no friends. I came home every day totally exhausted and overstimulated– I had no energy or mental capacity left to engage with my family, friends, or home life, and got through those years reading pulp fantasy novels to escape. At 12, I spent my lunch break being educated by ghetto 13-year-olds about the kinds of sexual acts their 18-year-old ghetto boyfriends expected of them. I was never directly bullied (my parents moved me out of the school system before that could happen– I was a walking target and they knew it), but my sister became suicidal. She was beaten, trapped in bathrooms, and humiliated by other girls repeatedly, and school admin would not do anything. They’d toss lit cigarette butts over the stall dividers into her lap while she was peeing. My brother started a years-long drug habit that nearly killed him (at 17), at our local high school. He said it was rough when he dropped out, because buying pot was so much riskier. My other sister is the only one who made it through ok: she didn’t learn anything in school itself and picked up a lifelong smoking habit there, but was very ambitious and did enough extracurricular to get scholarships and go to a good college. Imagine what she could have done if she hadn’t had to spend 7 hours a day, 9 months a year, 13 years, in school, plus homework!

          From what I can tell, our school system is not bad, by national standards. About average.

          //So, it’s not economical for YOU//

          It is economical. We ran the numbers. My earning potential in the workforce is quite low. $25k-$30k/yr at best. Once you subtract the cost of childcare, work wardrobe, commute, food I would not be cooking at home, additional doctor visits due to kids bringing home every virus from daycare/school, entertainment to make up for spending forty hours a week at a crappy service job I hate, and hiring people to do the half-dozen other things that I would not have the time to do… I’d be effectively bringing home $6k or less a year, and as a reward, we’d pay more taxes and my kids would be getting a crap education in the local school system. And we STILL wouldn’t be able to afford to move to a “good” school district. So the tradeoff is: our household gives up maybe six grand a year, and in return, my kids are literate, healthy, and I get to actually spend time with them and see them grow up. The way we see it, I can’t afford to work!

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          1. \ being educated by ghetto 13-year-olds about the kinds of sexual acts their 18-year-old ghetto boyfriends expected of them… toss lit cigarette butts over the stall dividers … when he dropped out, because buying pot was so much riskier.

            // our school system is not bad, by national standards. About average.

            Any school in which a significant number of kids come from such families and sit with you in the same classroom is horrible.

            Was this school drawing students mainly from poor areas?

            I am sure public schools in Clarissa’s suburb are not like that.

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            1. Clarissa’s family makes a lot more money than we do. I’m still not sure I’d want to settle for the kind of school district she can afford. I have nieces and nephews who attend school in very highly-rated, expensive-real-estate districts, and my husband spent some time working in some of those “good” schools… while the kids are better behaved on average, the culture is trash, smartphones are ubiquitous, bullying is still a problem, and the kids are learning nothing because the admin refuses to remove disruptive kids from the classrooms (it would make their numbers look bad), so every class is a competition to be heard, between the teacher and the three most obnoxious children.

              Tell me again how it’s important to be socialized in the school system…

              I live in a county whose total population is under 200,000. We are a small city that is not near any major metropolitan areas, so it’s not a suburb of anything. This means that while there are five high schools, and some are marginally better or worse, there is really no way to avoid your kids going to school with a significant number of kids from “such families”. The geographic area covered by each school includes both middle-class and poor neighborhoods. If you can drive your kid there each day, and you’re lucky enough to “win” the charter-school lottery, there are two really decent but quite small charter schools. Otherwise, it’s homeschool or private school. We live out in the boondocks, so driving the kids is not an option. We can’t afford private school. So we homeschool– we sacrifice to make that happen, because it’s the ONLY acceptable option.

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              1. I’m apprehensive about the public school because I’ve heard about some unhealthy practices of theirs. I’ll wait and see. If it turns out to be crap, there’s a small Catholic school next door, so we’ll try that. If it’s bad, too, we’ll move to STL and I’ll work myself into the ground to pay for the Waldorf School. It’s almost cheaper to send the kid to Yale but these are my options.

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            2. @el //Was this school drawing students mainly from poor areas?//

              More specific answer: No. But all it takes is a non-trivial minority of these students, with the administration refusing to engage in any kind of discipline, and voila! Your school is a cesspit! There is nothing parents can do to change this.

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  6. Australia was so proud to have stopped the spread. They locked down so early now they have to do it again. Many epidemiologists have expressed the futility of the lockdowns. I think NY is probably doing so well now because we locked down ^after^ the virus spread all over.

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  7. If you’re interested,

    Рассказ очевидца из Минска

    Страна Для Жизни LIVE, [11.08.20 19:35]
    Рассказываю то, что видел и пережил сам вчера в Минске, на следующий день после выборов в Беларуси. Я многодетный отец (7 детей). Христианин.
    Меня вчера захватили омоновцы около КЗ Минск в 19,00. Был с двумя родными братьями. Сидел в машине, припаркованной вдоль дороги. Просто хотели быть недалеко от центра города и молиться за ситуацию в Беларуси.

    https://notabler.livejournal.com/841507.html

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  8. Regarding our conversation about quality of schools and money:

    In Rod’s post describing a new trend of demanding “white men on campus” to take the anti racist pledge (devised by RIT Director of Diversity Education), Rod mentioned this interesting RL experiment:

    // In 1987, a rich donor in Philadelphia “adopted” 112 black 6th graders, few of whom had grown up with fathers in their home. He guaranteed them a fully funded education through college as long as they did not do drugs, have children before getting married, or commit crimes. He also gave them tutors, workshops, after-school programs, kept them busy in summer programs, and provided them with counselors for when they had any kind of problem. Yes, this really happened.

    The result? 45 never made it through high school. Of the 67 boys, 19 became felons. Twelve years later, the 45 girls had had 63 children, and more than half had become mothers before the age of 18. Part of what makes How to Be an Antiracist a simple book is its neglect of cases like this, or the assumption that they easily trace to “racism.” What held those poor kids back was that they had been raised amidst a different sense of what is normal than white kids in the ‘burbs. That is, yes, another way of saying “culture,” and it means that through no fault of their own, it was not resources, but those unconsciously internalized norms, that kept them from being able to take advantage of what they were being offered.

    https://www.theamericanconservative.com/dreher/antiracism-rit-commissar-faculty/

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    1. Your personality is formed before the age of 5. There’s absolutely nothing, nothing, nothing that can override early childhood condition and genes. I just talked to an extremely clean-living friend in whose family everybody suffers a stroke before the age of 40. No matter what they do or how they watch their health, it happens. Genes are a bastard. At the same time, they are all extremely intelligent, highly educated people. Genes are also a boon.

      Like

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