Another Election

“So. What are your thoughts on the election??” I asked a friend who came to this country a year before I did.

She perked up and started going on in great detail but I couldn’t recognize anything of what she described.

“Wait, what are you talking about?” I finally said.

It turned out she was talking about a local – not even a national but simply a regional – election in her country of origin.

The same thing happened to me in 2016 when I met a long-lost high school friend and asked her about the election. She went on in great detail about the election of the Moscow mayor.

These aren’t people from prissy cultures where one avoids talking about politics. This was a sincere mistake. Like when Canada plays against Russia in a hockey championship and the immigrant newspaper comes out with a headline “We Won!”

4 thoughts on “Another Election”

  1. The one thing I can say is that this truly, honestly doesn’t happen in Israel except possibly in a few unrepresentative cases.

    Guess that’s why when you described your vision of Israeli FSU immigrants in the past, it sounded off (untrue) to me and even insulting to my group.

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  2. LOL
    I can barely name a couple of politicians from my country of origin, never mind about keeping up with when they have elections. But then, I could never understand the type of an immigrant that hangs onto their old country so much, but I guess I may be in the minority. If you make a life-changing move like that you may as well go all in. Granted, you will never be completely like a local, but the US is as friendly to immigrants as it gets.

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    1. I could never understand the type of an immigrant that hangs onto their old country so much, but I guess I may be in the minority. If you make a life-changing move like that you may as well go all in.

      This is me, as well, but we seem to be in the minority. I’ve been in the US for 21 years now. I have no idea what’s happening politically in ancestral home, nor do I care, if I’m being honest. Going all in has definite benefits in terms of making a real home in the new place and taking full advantage of available opportunities. My kids only speak English and we’re as assimilated as one gets.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. “I have no idea what’s happening politically in ancestral home, nor do I care”

        That’s a luxury reserved for those from insignificant pissant countries (or anonymous shitholes). If you’re from the US the need to follow events follows you around breathing down your neck…
        Part of me would love to be ignorant of whatever suicidal political fad the US population is following but it’s not that easy…
        On the other hand I am completely ignorant of the political situation in the state I lived in for 90% or so of my US tenure (the cesspit of political corruption and dysfunctional poverty known as Florida).

        Liked by 2 people

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