Cognitive Dissonance

The beauty of this table layout is in direct contradiction to my desire to eat borscht.

Sorry, all this talk about borscht reminded me thar I urgently need to go make some borscht.

20 thoughts on “Cognitive Dissonance”

  1. I wonder how you make borscht. I grew up eating borscht once a week. My parents lived in Germany for a few years. I was born there when my dad was in the army. I’m not sure where my mom picked up her recipe but I have very fond memories of borscht. And I eat a lot of cabbage. I love this post. Good memories.

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    1. “what is it?”

      Too small, too unfilling and too…. (shudder)…. healthy. That’s what it is. I fully understand the need for borsht to restore equilibrium to the universe.

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  2. So you find a good piece of meat, add the meat to the pot, start cooking it, get all excited to eat cooked meat, and then you…take most of the meat away and replace it with cabbage.

    Where I am from we don’t call that food. We call it a dirty trick and stop being friends with anyone associated to it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. “Where I am from we don’t call that food. We call it a dirty trick and stop being friends with anyone associated to it.”

      Really–?? Well, where I was raised in a long-ago South many decades ago, we were taught to refer to any dish that a gracious host offered to her invited guests as “dinner,” and to eat all of it eagerly and completely, and to show respect by accepting seconds when they were invariably offered. That attitude got me invited as a young man into many homes, and I always departed well-fed and healthy and welcome back.

      Today after the COVID scourge finishes with Arizona, the local Austrian Society to which I belong will resume its monthly potluck suppers, and I will continue my lifelong behavior of being a great dinner guest — and both the hosts and I will remain good friends.

      I’ve never eaten borscht, and very little cabbage. But if I were passing through Illinois, and Clarissa invited this reader to feast at her home, I would devour everything that she put on my plate with gusto, and my pleasure would be genuine and obvious.

      All my life I’ve been surrounded by lovely people who have been much better cooks than this bachelor will ever be. What kind of idiot would be insulting or ungrateful in such an ideal situation?

      Liked by 1 person

    2. “take most of the meat away and replace it with cabbage….Where I am from we don’t call that food. ”

      I was assuming it was like some Italian sauces with large cuts of meat which are taken out and then consumed separately as a main course (while the remaining sauce is used to dress the pasta).

      I do something similar with krupnik (a Polish soup made with fatty pork or pork ribs, barley, onions, carrots and celery root) I take out the pork have a bowl or two of soup and then have the pork with mustard…

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      1. @ cliff arroyo: my comment was a joke. Mediterraneans do the same thing with chicken, by boiling it to make a broth that is the basis of a soup, and the chicken pieces themselves removed, fried, seasoned, and served separately 🙂

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        1. “Mediterraneans do the same thing with chicken, by boiling it to make a broth that is the basis of a soup, and the chicken pieces themselves removed”

          That was my dinner today, though it was duck and not chicken… and I didn’t fry the meat (though I took it out and had it separately).

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