Terrorism or Hooliganism?

A homemade bomb exploded at a bus stop in Moscow. Three women were injured.

13 thoughts on “Terrorism or Hooliganism?

  1. According to the English-language links that I can find, this was a suicide bomber, and it was the second bombing of a public transportation site in Russia in two days.

    As opposed to terrorists, why would simple “hooligans” (low-life thugs, as I understand the term) be setting off bombs in Russia?

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    1. “As opposed to terrorists, why would simple “hooligans” (low-life thugs, as I understand the term) be setting off bombs in Russia?”

      Russian-speaking people (all of us, not just Russians) are a very angry bunch. When my husband was 9-11 years old, he’d set up explosions in abandoned barns to express his inner rage. He’s now the most peaceful and law-abiding person ever but his origins are what they are. I was just as disturbed as him but I’m now much better. That’s how we all are but many people don’t have the resources to seek help.

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      1. Wow! I’ve set up explosions as well when I was a kid. Now I can tell a lot of stories that shock law-obedient middle class Americans. At that time – yes, one can ascribe that to unexpressed inner anger. But I still like explosions to this day. Without casualties or injuries, of course… The chemistry sets one can buy on this continent deeply offend me by playing it safe.

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      2. \ Russian-speaking people (all of us, not just Russians) are a very angry bunch.
        … people would literally jump at each other’s throats and start pummeling each other … And the kind of shit that family members inflict on each other, casually and routinely, is fit for a Stephen King novel.

        I have been very sheltered till we left to Israel in my early teens and completely missed that. As for inside family, I don’t think Russian speaking Jews are like that. Have known a few in Israel and they were not this way. Of course, my family wasn’t like that either.

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        1. I talked with my mother about Russians being angry and she did agree with that and reminded me of a few cases. For instance, my female friend at school fighting once with another girl from our class. However, my mother did say it is not so for Russian-speaking Jews. She said it is on a genetical level, but I view it as a matter of culture.

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          1. Not Russians, Russian speakers.

            Anger doesn’thave to manifest in physical altercations. Depending on social class, people use different forms of aggression. Wounding comments and controlling behavior, for instance, are a sign of aggression. Sarcasm, scoffing at people’s plans or achievements, malicious gossip, etc.

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    2. Clockwork orange reasons – other humans don’t really exist and injuring them brings joy.

      The level of casual violence in Russia is really rather astonishing – being beaten up, fighting off an attack or being threatened with a weapon are usual and expected events even for the middle class.

      Given that baseline, it is hard to tell whether a particular act of violence was ideologically inspired or not.

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      1. “The level of casual violence in Russia is really rather astonishing – being beaten up, fighting off an attack or being threatened with a weapon are usual and expected events even for the middle class.”

        • Exactly. I saw many situations where people would literally jump at each other’s throats and start pummeling each other because somebody accidentally pushed somebody on the bus. Very educated, respectable people. And the kind of shit that family members inflict on each other, casually and routinely, is fit for a Stephen King novel. It’s all like that, we are all like that, and it’s our tragedy.

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        1. ” It’s all like that, we are all like that, and it’s our tragedy.”

          I’d say that the real tragedy is that so many Russian speakers are proud of the emotional carnage and warble on about dusha and other nonsense to excuse it.

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  2. I remember the movie “A Clockwork Orange” very well, but it’s hard for me to imagine a real-life country where ultra-violence like the film depicted actually occurs on a day-to-day basis.

    Apparently, from what I read above, that’s the case in Russia!

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    1. It is difficult to explain, but it is true in some ways. There was never such distance between middle class and a ghetto in the SU. So my experiences of a kid growing up in a very educated family in a decent suburb seem to closely match the experiences one would get in some pretty rough neighborhoods in North America. And then there were legendary places where it was much worse.

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