Advertisements

Clarissa's Blog

An academic's opinions on feminism, politics, literature, philosophy, teaching, academia, and a lot more.

And Even More

I’ve saddled my second favorite topic after the nation-state and now I can’t stop.

Imagine a diabetic who says, “I’m such an idiot. Once again, I wasted a ton of time yesterday, tracking my blood sugars, controlling my diet and injecting insulin instead of working on this important project I have at work.” What would you tell him? “No, you ‘wasted all this time in order to be able to keep living and working, you silly goose.”

It’s exactly the same for people who blame themselves for “wasting” 5 hours on browsing Facebook or binge-watching Netflix or whatever instead of working or being productive. Like that imaginary diabetic, they fail to realize that this “useless” activity is their insulin. They do it not instead of but in order to keep living and working. 

And if you are the kind of person who’d never blame a diabetic for being a diabetic, then you’ve got to ask yourself why you are so much more forgiving of physiological burdens than of psychological ones. (And if you are the kind of person who’d blame a diabetic, then you shouldn’t be on this blog because you are kind of dumb). 

The only way of getting rid of a compensatory mechanism begins with embracing it and feeling thankful to it. Even if it’s something clearly harmful like alcohol or even an opiate addiction. I know somebody who kicked a heroin addiction, and that was his first step. I also know somebody who successfully treated dozens of heroin addicts, and he confirms that this is the unavoidable first step. 

Once you embrace your compensatory mechanisms, you’ll be able to get enough energy from them to move to the next step. 

Advertisements

Single Post Navigation

2 thoughts on “And Even More

  1. Nelson on said:

    And if you are the kind of person who’d never blame a diabetic for being a diabetic, then you’ve got to ask yourself why you are so much more forgiving of physiological burdens than of psychological ones.

    Maria Bamford gave a talk, wondering what it would sound like if people with physiological illnesses were treated the way we treat people with psychological illnesses:

    Like

  2. It’s taken me a long time to start being OK with liking/enjoying the things I enjoy. It’s a work in progress. I am still often overwhelmed by guilt at how unsophisticated my tastes and how primitive my needs are.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: