Company Culture

“Company culture” is the most promising of the concepts that are trendy in business these days. Look at what it can produce.

It’s clear this won’t be produced by political means. So I’ll take any alternative gladly.

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15 thoughts on “Company Culture”

  1. Interesting.

    A side effect of standardizing these benefits is that you don’t get a rash of people who simply apply to higher level jobs regardless of talent or aptitude because that’s the only way they can afford to live.

    Of course she does this because the customer service team and the retail employees have to serve as “human representative” of her brand and turnover affects that. The warehouse employees aren’t completely fungible because they ensure the garments are dry cleaned and get to where they need to be. And lastly, the type of people who use Rent the Runway, tend to have the income to support any such markups and won’t tolerate a slippage in luxury service.

    I would never be a customer, but that’s because they don’t have my specific sizes and without that it doesn’t matter how expensive or name brand something is because it’s going to look sloppy. Most designers only design for a specific size set. Purses give me anxiety and if I’m among people who care about jewelry they tend to only go for precious jewels–and their designer selection runs to crystal and semi precious jewels.

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    1. Of course, this is something that only smaller companies can be enticed to do. The behemoths like Amazon have no incentive for now. But it’s a good trend.

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      1. Of course the size of the company has something to do with it. But also, I think the clientele and the type of business is a much more important factor. I don’t go into Walmart or the corner convenience store expecting stellar customer service. But with that particular business — I absolutely would. That clientele is primed to go
        “I was told by AppleCare” at the smallest inconvenience and doesn’t have the numbers that Apple does. When would you typically rent clothing, jewelry or handbags if you were going to do it? Special occasions. Rent the Runway, cannot, for now, automate significant parts of their business.

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        1. I don’t know, the best service I consistently get is at the small convenience stores where I believe academics should go on field trips to learn about worker pride and deriving pleasure from work.

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          1. That’s independent of the business model and in spite of how a lot of convenience stores actually treat their workers.

            You are seeing this level of service despite the fact that many of these convenience store owners are breaking laws, withholding and cheating workers of their pay and most people never step inside a convenience store to purchase anything other than gas. I consulted briefly with a gas station owner who didn’t believe in labor laws and recruited people who were being paid under the table elsewhere.

            Gas is a commodity and it barely matters where you get it.

            The only reason most people visit a convenience store with gas is because it is on the commute of the drivers. That’s it. It has zip to do with how friendly the workers are. No workers, no matter how friendly and great are going to induce the median customer to drive out of their way.

            At best customer service is neutral and at worst it can damage the business. The workers are dispensable and frankly the only reason they hire humans is they need someone to hit the shut off valve to prevent an explosion if something happens with the tanks. They assume high turnover.

            Of course Amazon et al has a much higher threshold before you’ll stop ordering from them. A business like Rent the Runway lives and dies on service so it changed their compensation accordingly. It has nothing to do with any kind of morals or ethics or image.

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            1. The minute they figure out how to shut off tanks remotely and automatically is the minute you’ll cease to see workers at any gas station. They’ve already figured out how to make gas pumps take credit cards and vending machines already take credit — so they’ll just move to card only and a number to call if you have problems. You’ll just see pumps and a bank of vending machines. LMAO.

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    1. It’s true that the “support stuff” has mushroomed. We don’t have a department secretary of our own yet there are crowds of people who do useless and annoying busywork in the offices of diversity and inclusion, assessment, political correctness unbound, etc. These are people who do nothing useful. But here is the catch. If we get rid of them, where will they go? Unskilled workers who feel they are above manual labor are not in demand. Should we just let them lumpenize? These do-nothing jobs proliferate to cushion the blow of the fluid economy that creates masses of superfluous workers. This is the real problem here.

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      1. I totally get the need for our economy to create more jobs as globalization and automation erode traditional work, though I do wish a bit more of the money would flow in the direction of actually useful jobs. I mean, why not give you a department secretary to restock the photocopier and answer random student questions, they could also open a really nice daycare on campus, and maybe hire a few more instructors so that the students can benefit from slightly smaller class sections. My university could stand to do the same and also renovate some of our older and slightly run down buildings while they are at it. There’s tons of real work that needs to be done.

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        1. Your’e talking about jobs that require skills (including things like following orders) that many who are in the make-work jobs don’t have. It’s not their fault, deskilling and de-professionalizing the US has been going on for a long time and its clear that most high school graduates are no more fit to hold down a job than fly to Canada for the summer on their own power*.
          Creating jobs for people without concrete work or life skills (or one but not the other) is best done by random bullshit jobs – which is still better than the alternative. Or schools could be repurposed to actually teaching things because it doesn’t seem to be what they’re about at present.

          *the same thing, not as extreme, has been happening in Europe, in Poland where I live finishing high school once meant a person could be trusted to learn and caryy out a job…. at present I’m not very sure if that’s still true.

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          1. I’m still utterly mystified by what it is that kids to for 12 years in American schools to arrive in college in a state of such pristine and unsullied ignorance. How is it possible that I’m meeting so many young people who graduated from high school without having read a single book in their lives?

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            1. It’s called getting them workforce ready. Reading books is considered superfluous to that. They’re supposed to be ready to be trained to carry out a specific aspect of a specific trade, and not anything else.

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              1. Honestly, with the utter incapacity to follow simple instructions or to take any criticism without falling to pieces, I don’t know who will want to hire these kids. It’s not everybody, of course, but it’s clearly the majority.

                And the total lack of understanding of US politics or government, I wonder what is being taught in civics classes.

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              2. From what I understand, there are no civics classes. Now of course, my students all work in the service sector, wait on tables, stock shelves, etc. Many take work a lot more seriously than they do school.

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