Lovable Imperfection

I’m very glad that Klara is into art and is constantly sculpting, building, drawing, painting, and glueing something together. She’s little, so the things she creates never look perfect. They are crooked, lopsided, something always sticks out in the wrong place, something falls off or bleeds through.

This way she learns that the world is imperfect but we still love its imperfections. And that things and people are precious not because they are perfect but because we put our love into them.

2 thoughts on “Lovable Imperfection

  1. English Wikipedia: “Kintsugi”

    “Kintsugi (“golden joinery”), also known as kintsukuroi (“golden repair”), is the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery by mending the areas of breakage with lacquer dusted or mixed with powdered gold, silver, or platinum; the method is similar to the maki-e technique. As a philosophy, it treats breakage and repair as part of the history of an object, rather than something to disguise.”

    “Kintsugi is the general concept of highlighting or emphasizing imperfections, visualizing mends and seams as an additive or an area to celebrate or focus on, rather than absence or missing pieces. Modern artists and designers experiment with the ancient technique as a means of analyzing the idea of loss, synthesis, and improvement through destruction and repair or rebirth. While originally ignored as a separate art form, kintsugi and related repair methods have been featured at exhibitions at the Freer Gallery at the Smithsonian, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art.”

    I especially like this term in Japanese: Ōtotsu no ume.

    It’s like the kanji show you the purpose is to put something back together as if it were a puzzle.

    BTW, why does your blog software filter content with Japanese characters in it?

    When I take out the kanji, I can get the comment to post.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. “Kintsugi (“golden joinery”), also known as kintsukuroi (“golden repair”), is the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery by mending the areas of breakage with lacquer dusted or mixed with powdered gold, silver, or platinum; the method is similar to the maki-e technique. As a philosophy, it treats breakage and repair as part of the history of an object, rather than something to disguise.”

    “Kintsugi is the general concept of highlighting or emphasizing imperfections, visualizing mends and seams as an additive or an area to celebrate or focus on, rather than absence or missing pieces. Modern artists and designers experiment with the ancient technique as a means of analyzing the idea of loss, synthesis, and improvement through destruction and repair or rebirth.”

    (from English Wikipedia: “Kintsugi”)

    I especially like this term in Japanese: Ōtotsu no ume.

    It’s like the kanji show you the purpose is to put something back together as if it were a puzzle.

    BTW, why does your blog software filter content with Japanese characters in it?

    When I take out the kanji and move a few things around, I can usually get the comment to post.

    Like

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