Sunday Link Encyclopedia and Self-Promotion

A brilliant post: “I hate this “I choose my choice” feminism. We do not have choices, in a lot of cases. The decision to participate in the nuclear family, to work in the waged labour force, to make sacrifices in one’s career for the sake of raising children, even the decision about what kinds of clothing to wear are constrained by material circumstances, they are not made in a vacuum.”

Yes: “This may be the first time many of you have heard this, given the high pedestal parents are put upon in American culture, but read my lips: you are not a fucking saint for providing for your own fucking children, that you chose to bring into this world. For whatever reason, under whatever circumstances, you chose to become a parent. . . Expecting that your child is obligated to worship at your feet for providing her basic needs is indicative of a very sociopathic, abusive mind. . . I’m sick of parents bestowing sainthood on themselves, and losing their shit when their children don’t treat them as such.” Once again, yes.

Romantic notions of farming as being some sort of “pure” work which is spiritually and emotionally enduring compared to city life has transformed into an entire cottage industry, appealing to city dwellers’ romantic notions of farming. . . It would appear that people who romanticise life in “the East”, or who wish to get “back in touch with nature” misunderstand nature and “the East” more than any other group.” I couldn’t agree more. What a great post this is. Highly recommended.

The Republicans in a major meltdown: “As Republicans lose ownership of what had been their strongest issues — national security and business — all the ugly muck at the depths of their ids are rising to the surface. Finally, there is nothing left but the primordial concern gnawing at their bones all these years — sex.

A very stupid person makes fun of a passage from the Bible (my favorite one, actually) and seems extremely proud of being an unintelligent, hateful jerk who thinks that being incapable of understanding complex texts is a badge of honor.

An insightful essay on why campus-wide smoking bans are stupid, endangering, offensive and wrong. The brilliant professor who wrote this essay is one of the very few people to point out that the current anti-smoking hysteria is paid for by pharmaceutical companies that want to peddle their smoking-cessation pills and patches.

Nice Guys aren’t found in the wild. But where do they come from? This is the question this great post answers.

A brilliant parody of the “What Are Women For?” article.

You don’t need to be a jerk to be an atheist. An important post on disturbing trends in the atheist community.

Seems like we have not seen the end of the Kennedy reign in the American politics. Now a representative of the new generation of Kennedys is running for office. I agree with this blogger who says enough with the nepotism in politics. Being somebody’s child, grandchild, wife or niece was only a good qualification for political office in times of monarchy.

Of course, it’s easy to disregard in the midst of the Republican anti-women campaign but President Obama keeps making these very disturbing sexist jokes about his daughters. And this helps reinforce the environment where women’s bodies always belong to some man.

Ron Paul: Trying to Take Away Constitutional Protections since 2004.

A short but wonderful post on how one blogger doesn’t let the Komen people pretend like no revelations about them have been made recently.

Is capitalism in crisis? “I do not believe that capitalism is in a real crisis, partly because the defects in financial and housing markets can be corrected to a significant extent. More importantly, reliance on competitive capitalism has been the only way that countries have been able to reduce poverty and continue to grow over long periods of time.”

And this is the most beautiful skyline in the world. Disagree with me on this at your own peril.

A very good (and a very short) short story.

Millions of Americans – despite witnessing an extremely loud and incredibly close prescription pill epidemic – seem wedded to a sense of themselves as chemically dependent.”

Experiencing chronic pain is not “just part of life” and people who suffer from chronic pain should not be dismissed.

The similarities between Obama’s, Santorum’s and Gingrich’s economic policies. I’ve never read any similar analysis anywhere before but it rings very true to me. Politicians love to distract us by loud screeching about sex and religion from the sad truth that they are bought and paid for by the same group of lobbyists.

Rick Santorum attacked President Obama on Saturday for his theology. Although people assumed that Santorum was, like other conservatives, hinting around that Obama is not a Christian but rather a secret Muslim, Santorum denied this allegation. . . What is remarkable is that it is Santorum who sounds like a Muslim fundamentalist. And ultimately maybe what he is saying is that Obama isn’t Muslim enough.”

A beautiful post on stimming.

And the title of the best post of the week goes to this brilliant post on patriarchal projections: “Patriarchal projections might not appear obviously what they are — which is to say, projections — just because they often rely upon a framing device to change the meaning of an event, depending upon whether the subject is male or female.  What is projected it the idea of female inferiority, which seems to be confirmed by any unusual event in the life of any woman.”

50 thoughts on “Sunday Link Encyclopedia and Self-Promotion”

  1. Stereotyping “the East” is ignorant and racist, but stereotyping “white people” is totally cool and brilliant. It shows how enlightened and progressive you are. One of the more contemptible things white people do is choosing to pick their own fruits and vegetables. It is much more unpretentious and enlightened to just buy your vegetables at the grocery store and not care who picked them, where they came from, or how long they have been sitting there.

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  2. Thanks for the links, Clarissa!

    Frankly, I’m surprised I haven’t received an influx of trolls on my no cookies for parents post. I expected a lot of people to be very angry with me for it. I’m glad to see I was wrong. 🙂

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  3. White people, yeah, have ideas about farming, but my type of white person were actual farmers. Here was their glorious fate: http://www.zimeye.org/?p=8021

    My gran had a hobby farm in Zim, but left to South Africa in the late eighties. There was a certain idyllic quality to owning a farm, but aspects of farming life would not have suited me.

    For instance, there was Harry, the turkey, whom my gran said was very territorial.

    “Where’s Harry?” she said. “Oh there, he is. He and I have a very contentious relationship. He wants to defend his territory and I find that annoying.”

    Next week, we came to Sunday lunch.”Oh, by the way, we will be eating Harry today. I had him killed last week. His bones were so large they wouldn’t fit into the pot!”

    –Well that if farm life.

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    1. ‘Next week, we came to Sunday lunch.”Oh, by the way, we will be eating Harry today. I had him killed last week. His bones were so large they wouldn’t fit into the pot!””

      – Your gran and I have a lot in common. I always wanted a rabbit as a pet but I realize that if I’m too lazy to go to the grocery store, I might just eat him one day. 🙂

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  4. As for the making fun of the Bible thing, I think there are different levels at which the Bible can be taken — some of which are quite esoteric. Contemporary culture, including intellectual culture, appears to have taken a very philistine turn, whereby everything that is written down must necessarily be taken in its most literal sense. Therefore you get entirely stupid interpretations, such as the one that my memoir is about “getting things wrong”. Sure it is, if you lack a sense of humor and are not prepared to take a fairly distant stance towards political correctness.

    A lot of Jesus’ recommendations are thoroughly shamanistic, in that he elevates subjective experience and subjective knowledge over official, authoritarian or materialistic perspectives. That is the core of Christianity that is worth saving (the patriarchal stuff, not so much).

    One absolutely has to be able to take things in a non-literal sense and sometimes in an ironic sense to be any kind of higher human being. Literalness is for those who are still struggling.

    Nietzsche, for instance, interpreted literally, ends up being quite a boorish, misogynist pig with very little to say for himself. If you interpret “masculinity” to mean “males” and “femininity” to mean “women”, then we are left with a prescription for a very rigid social order, in which mean go about and act heroically and women can’t figure out what they hell that means, because women are too base and uncomprehending to be able to figure out much of anything.

    At the same time, there is an equal and opposite danger in not realizing that when religiously based politicians pronounce, “We are loving women best by restricting their freedoms,” they are quite literally being boorish and contemptuous of women’s intelligence, whilst using a religious veil to cover their ugly demeanor.

    Perhaps the resort to literalness is a natural result of people feeling so often tricked. Dorpat (See: http://www.amazon.com/Gaslighting-Interrogation-Methods-Psychotherapy-Analysis/dp/1568218281 ) says that one resorts to a very literal frame of mind when one senses a relationship has become abusive. One is no longer open enough with oneself or others to be able to dig deep from the psyche.

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    1. “One absolutely has to be able to take things in a non-literal sense and sometimes in an ironic sense to be any kind of higher human being. Literalness is for those who are still struggling.”

      – Good point. I always wonder if such people are really incapable of not seeing everything literally or if they are faking it because they think it’s cute.

      “At the same time, there is an equal and opposite danger in not realizing that when religiously based politicians pronounce, “We are loving women best by restricting their freedoms,” they are quite literally being boorish and contemptuous of women’s intelligence, whilst using a religious veil to cover their ugly demeanor.”

      – I am in favor of complete separation between church and state. If anybody deserves of ridicule it’s the politicians who bring their religious beliefs into the political process. Those are all complete jerks who have mush for brains. And the funny thing is that their reading of the Bible is as literal as that of the blogger I linked to.

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  5. Having grown up in a fundamentalist Xtian culture, in which the literal truth of every word of the Bible was absolutely nit to be questioned, and having read the entire Bible twice and had it read aloud to me by my father a third time, I feel quite qualified to say that it is silly, evil, and designed to be emotionally abusive for the purpose of keeping control over people so they will keep giving money to the church. I understand intellectually that there are Xtians who do not insist on the literal truth of everything from Genesis to The Revelation of St. John the Divine, but I am always inclined to doubt their sincerity. I always suspect that they will sooner or later show their true colors and be indistinguishable from the Biblical literalists who condemn everyone who does not agree with them to eternal damnation. I have, in fact, had Xtians tell me that, as I am a non-Xtian, it is not appropriate for me to try to make distinctions between different groups of Xtians. So I do not. There are White Supremacist Christians, Black Supremacist Christians, Pentecostal Christians, Catholics, Christians who protest funerals of soldiers because of this country’s tolerance of homosexuals, and many others. I have been told by Christians that I am not allowed to distinguish amongst these, and it would be disrespectful of their religion for me to do so, so I am being respectful.

    I attended a Fundamentalist Christian undergraduate college, and about ten percent of the undergrad courses I took were about the Bible. Please do not say I do not understand Christianity. Gingrich and Santorum are somewhat liberal compared to the Christianity that I know.

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    1. A healthy religion is one where people do not insist on the literal truth of their mythology. Christianity is NOT such a faith. This is why we have, and no doubt will always have, people insisting that God created the world just as it says in Genesis, and that it is wrong, yea, evil, to teach anything different to children. This is Christianity.

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      1. “A healthy religion is one where people do not insist on the literal truth of their mythology. Christianity is NOT such a faith.”

        – This sounds like a suggestion that I should abandon my worldview because some people somewhere something. It’s just like the suggestion that I should abandon feminism because some radical feminists somewhere. . . And that I should abandon psychoanalysis because some ignoramuses somewhere. . . And that I should give up on literary criticism because Paul de Man something something. . . And I should stop saying I’m a Liberal because there are nasty Liberals who made sexist remarks. (I have actually heard all of these suggestions.)

        Take any worldview, any field of knowledge, any system of beliefs and you will discover that somebody has made quite a mess of it. But is the response to that just to give up on these fields of knowledge, etc. because they have now been irredeemably spoiled?

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      2. Re: this and sexist atheists something something — maybe some folks here are aware of the incredible internet meltdown of YouTube / Reddit superstar The_Amazing_Atheist. If not, click link for ultimate facepalm, but be warned: this guy is one huge buttery slice of trigger pie.

        Pretty much every other internet atheist with a shred of self-respect is contradicting their most treasured beliefs by actively praying that this terrible man goes away forever.

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    2. “There are White Supremacist Christians, Black Supremacist Christians, Pentecostal Christians, Catholics, Christians who protest funerals of soldiers because of this country’s tolerance of homosexuals, and many others.”

      – And then there is me. Do you feel emotionally abused and controlled by me? Or do you suspect that I’m about to condemn people to eternal damnation. If so, I have to mention that I do not believe in eternal damnation. 🙂 And even less in my powers to condemn anybody to it. 🙂

      I have a lot of compassion towards your experiences which sounds quite horrible. However, I feel that it’s kind of unfair for me to be judged because of some people I have never met and am not likely to meet. Imagine being judged as an American on the basis of what Americans show themselves to be outside of the country. That would not be pleasant, would it? There were Americans who invaded Iraq and Vietnam and there were people who protested the invasions. Should we lump them all together and condemn them wholesale?

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  6. David Bellamy :
    A healthy religion is one where people do not insist on the literal truth of their mythology. Christianity is NOT such a faith. This is why we have, and no doubt will always have, people insisting that God created the world just as it says in Genesis, and that it is wrong, yea, evil, to teach anything different to children. This is Christianity.

    I agree in general that Christianity is not such a faith. I’m also tired of people assuming I am naive, born yesterday. I’ve undergone the most exquisite agonies freeing myself from my family’s fundamentalism, which included their group psychological projections of all the wrongs of the world onto me.

    Americans have to realize that their experiences with religion don’t define everybody else’s perspectives. One is not necessarily naive just because one is not part of America’s cultural history and therefore does not have a binary opposition to anything remotely religious.

    My intellectual shamanism — which is definitively atheistic — has all too often been condemned by anti-religious zealots.

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    1. “A healthy religion is one where people do not insist on the literal truth of their mythology. Christianity is NOT such a faith. This is why we have, and no doubt will always have, people insisting that God created the world just as it says in Genesis, and that it is wrong, yea, evil, to teach anything different to children. This is Christianity.

      I agree in general that Christianity is not such a faith. ”

      – In this particular context, the only person who insisted on the literal truth of anything was the anti-Christian blogger I linked to. And let’s not even start on how many people insist on the literal interpretation of the US Constitution. There are also some very literal brands of Judaism and Islam. Literal thinking has nothing to do with anybody’s specific religion or lack thereof.

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    1. Oy, you missed my posts on religion a while ago. 🙂 They were quite popular.

      I’m Jewish in terms of my ethnic origin. But we haven’t practiced Judaism in my family for over 100 years (for the obvious reasons.) My Jewish father recently converted to the Russian Orthodox church. I don’t get it but that’s his choice, of course.

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  7. Literature is rich with many interpretations and ‘layers of meaning’ but according to Christians we must not use such insights in reading the Bible. I only interpret the Bible literally since I have been told by Xtians that that it how it is intended, like a physics research paper, or a population survey of fish in a stream. I do not interpret other stories and mythology literally.

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    1. I know that there are all those movements where people touch snakes and do other strange stuff based on literal readings. Good for them, I say, as long as they don’t try to involve anybody against their will.

      I don’t think I have even met a real fundamentalist in person. I just read about them. 🙂

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      1. I would be surprised if there were not a lot of fundamentalists among your students. You have written about their being deeply offended by nudity in films, for example. This is a pretty strong signal, I think.

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        1. “I would be surprised if there were not a lot of fundamentalists among your students. You have written about their being deeply offended by nudity in films, for example. This is a pretty strong signal, I think.”

          – A person who has worked here for a long time tells me this, too. And she also says that such students are told by their religious leaders to provoke professors into saying things that can be interpreted as being anti-religious in order to persecute such professors after that. This is not making me feel very relaxed in the classroom.

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  8. bloggerclarissa :
    – In this particular context, the only person who insisted on the literal truth of anything was the anti-Christian blogger I linked to. And let’s not even start on how many people insist on the literal interpretation of the US Constitution. There are also some very literal brands of Judaism and Islam. Literal thinking has nothing to do with anybody’s specific religion or lack thereof.

    In general, organised religion is literal religion.

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    1. “In general, organised religion is literal religion.”

      – There are few things I hate more than organized religion. Especially the Christian kind. I even hate cockroaches less and that’s a lot to say for an insectophobe like myself.

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  9. My “religion” is intellectual shamanism. It propounds that one should try to do with the scaffolding of civilization as much as possible. This is by no means because civilization is evil. To the contrary, it is an overwhelming good. Rather, one should not rely on systems of support because there are nearly always power interests embedded, that would “assist” you at the cost of your subjectivity.

    Intellectual shamanism upholds one’s subjectivity as the pearl beyond any price. One loses that and one loses one’s very self. And, it is all too easy to lose aspects of one’s subjectivity through contemporary pharmaceutics, through submission to authorities, religious and secular, and through playing safe.

    One must therefore go out to meet one’s fears, including fear of death, so as to free one’s subjectivity from various unseen binds. The recovery of oneself through such a practice of facing what one fears the most is the ecstasy that marks a shamanistic healing.

    This is about as spiritual as it gets.

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  10. “My “religion” is intellectual shamanism…”

    This is a beautiful post, Scratchy888.

    I have always felt that it was impossible to truly be a shaman in this (U. S. A.) culture, since the time required to maintain the subjective consciousness states are so prohibitively time-consuming as to make it impossible to deal with mundane concerns such a getting food, shoveling snow, etc. But I applaud you if you are able to do so! It is truly wonderful.

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  11. David Bellamy :
    “My “religion” is intellectual shamanism…”
    This is a beautiful post, Scratchy888.
    I have always felt that it was impossible to truly be a shaman in this (U. S. A.) culture, since the time required to maintain the subjective consciousness states are so prohibitively time-consuming as to make it impossible to deal with mundane concerns such a getting food, shoveling snow, etc. But I applaud you if you are able to do so! It is truly wonderful.

    Yeah, I must be a veritable ape to have managed it. Bravo to me and salutations!

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  12. bloggerclarissa :
    “Yeah, I must be a veritable ape to have managed it. Bravo to me and salutations!”
    – Off-topic: was it your blog where I saw something really funny about apes? My brain has melted today.

    That’s where you saw it. I’ve decided that people are apes and are best treated as such. Onward and forward!

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  13. Hmmm. There are five species of apes on the planet (and may we all survive and prosper.) Orangutans, gorillas, chimpanzees, bonobos, and humans are all different from each other, in wonderful ways. I am sure that studying all five can give us useful, nay, profound insights into our lives. But grouping all apes together is too vague to be of much use, it seems to me.

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  14. Thing is, with my beautiful feminine prose, that Bellamy so rightfully and diligently criticizes, it has nothing to do with American problems or world views. Rather, my intellectual shaman in question lived on park benches in all sorts of weather, in order to preserve his sense of freedom. I’m sure Clarissa would be particularly admiring of my subject’s critique of African communism, but I digress. This guy lived under hedges, in order to preserve his freedom.

    Were Hell other people
    And not myself I could willingly
    Diagnose the scratchings at the other side
    Of the door.
    The telephone rings: from the other end of the line
    My name and voice introduce themselves: poet.
    Finger-fat delusions wash themselves
    In the dish of dollars
    And proceed to eat liberation’s sadza and stew.
    Bullet-proof brains
    Take case iron pains
    To maintain their ignorance;
    Their wide bellied and Castro beards
    Are the matter of many a snide joke.
    What can violet flowers not do
    Their perfume Baptist to Thrones of Bayonets?
    I came out of the Harare barber shop, my hair white
    And bright like icecream melting.
    A single finger traces on the sand
    The simple design of death
    Whose centre is everywhere
    Whose circumference is nowhere.
    The sight of blood makes me hunger
    After raw tomatoes
    After the cream and rose complexion of Nordic
    Girls,
    Makes me thirst for the Masai’s bull-wrought
    Resilience
    And perhaps a glass of Gerac, that savanna sundowner
    Of redneck modalities.
    Were regrets basket chairs
    We’d be condemned to sit for life,
    Or sit still passionately; the Siamese cats
    Nuzzle against my ankle, purring.
    In the garage of the imagination
    Quietly sparkling, A Rolls Royce, Pulsar, an
    Alfa Romeo.

    I will smear my face with soft lanoline,
    With American Girl Hand Body Lotion
    With Ambi skin-lightening cream—
    With pasteurized and bionised dung.

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  15. A very stupid person makes fun of a passage from the Bible (my favorite one, actually) and seems extremely proud of being an unintelligent, hateful jerk who thinks that being incapable of understanding complex texts is a badge of honor.

    You forgot “fat”, “lazy”, “drunk”, and “loser”, for starters.

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      1. “You don’t need to be a jerk to be an atheist. An important post on disturbing trends in the atheist community.”

        Now where was it I just ran across this link and it’s prefaced editorial commentary?

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  16. I must say about the idea that Christianity is a fundamental religion where believers are supposed to insist on the literal truth of the Bible… funny, I think the Roman Catholics, who are still the majority of Christians on the planet, would disagree with you. As for me, I was raised Protestant, mainly Methodist and Presbyterian, and back when I was a kid — the late 60s, early to mid-70s — I wasn’t taught like that either. Though I don’t think the word “metaphor” was ever actually used, it was more or less the way we were taught about a lot of what was in the Bible. As in: Jonah wasn’t actually swallowed by a giant whale, it was a metaphor for a spiritual crisis, a “darkness of the soul.” (On the other hand we were supposed to believe Jesus really did walk on water, but he could do that because he was Jesus. It was a mixed bag.)

    But anyway, this whole fundamentalist, literal interpretation thing became popular in the US starting in the 70s due, I think, to the fact that the country was going through a spiritual crisis as fallout from the upheavals earlier in the century, up to the Sixties and Vietnam and that whole thing. I think it’s popular because it’s a simpler way of looking at things — there are none of those difficult, frightening questions about whether this really happened as recounted or did the gospel writer mean something else and are we going to have to (oh noes!) actually think and argue about whether or not Jesus really did provide magical endless fishes and loaves to the multitude? Etc. Too many Americans are simply not good at this sort of thing — we don’t teach it in school because schools are giant prisons and anything that makes the student think will make them think things that will help them break out — and having to think about things like this frustrate and scare them so when someone comes along and says “Of course humans didn’t descend from monkeys and apes — it says right there in the Bible that God made Adam and Eve!” they are relieved. America is still a frontier nation in mentality and people here tend to prefer to be doers rather than thinkers because the Indian raid or the tornado is always right around the corner (to our psyches, anyway) and if you sit around thinking all the time you’re of no use.

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    1. “America is still a frontier nation in mentality and people here tend to prefer to be doers rather than thinkers because the Indian raid or the tornado is always right around the corner (to our psyches, anyway) and if you sit around thinking all the time you’re of no use.”

      – That’s a very good explanation. It took me a long time to understand that this mentality existed and where it came from. The distrust for the government, for example, also comes from this frontier mentality.

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  17. But anyway, this whole fundamentalist, literal interpretation thing became popular in the US starting in the 70s due, I think, to the fact that the country was going through a spiritual crisis as fallout from the upheavals earlier in the century, up to the Sixties and Vietnam and that whole thing. I think it’s popular because it’s a simpler way of looking at things — there are none of those difficult, frightening questions about whether this really happened as recounted or did the gospel writer mean something else and are we going to have to (oh noes!) actually think and argue about whether or not Jesus really did provide magical endless fishes and loaves to the multitude? Etc. Too many Americans are simply not good at this sort of thing — we don’t teach it in school because schools are giant prisons and anything that makes the student think will make them think things that will help them break out — and having to think about things like this frustrate and scare them so when someone comes along and says “Of course humans didn’t descend from monkeys and apes — it says right there in the Bible that God made Adam and Eve!” they are relieved. America is still a frontier nation in mentality and people here tend to prefer to be doers rather than thinkers because the Indian raid or the tornado is always right around the corner (to our psyches, anyway) and if you sit around thinking all the time you’re of no use.

    Not true at all. I grew up in the 1950’s and it was well established. My parents grew up in the 1920’s and 1930’s. Same situation. And read, say, Craddock’s commentaries on the bible from the 1500’s (or maybe 1600’s.)

    I have heard that Thomas Jefferson was appalled by the rising rebirth of biblical literalism and was horrified by it, although I have no reference handy.

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    1. “Not true at all. I grew up in the 1950′s and it was well established. My parents grew up in the 1920′s and 1930′s. Same situation. And read, say, Craddock’s commentaries on the bible from the 1500′s (or maybe 1600′s.)

      I have heard that Thomas Jefferson was appalled by the rising rebirth of biblical literalism and was horrified by it, although I have no reference handy.”

      – This is not good news. This sounds like this country doesn’t have any historic era free from fundamentalism. I understand that small pockets of fundamentalism will always exist but the idea that it has been so prevalent in this country is not very encouraging.

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    2. “Not true at all. I grew up in the 1950′s and it was well established.”

      Maybe it was where you lived but not in my town. That was Miami, Florida, by the way. It’s a slightly different part of the country — more cosmopolitan, more diverse. It’s not perfect — in fact, I hated the place and couldn’t wait to move out, but that was due to things like crime, traffic, heat, and how expensive it was to live there. But I find myself missing a lot of the things about living in Miami — Cuban food (especially Cuban coffee!), Jewish delis (Miami has one of the largest Jewish communities in the US), the fact that prejudiced white people tended to avoid the place because ew, so many foreigners…

      Of course, there were fundamentalists and Southern Baptists and all that, but they weren’t a majority. And my mother had been raised Baptist and wanted nothing to do with them.

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  18. The thread here on fundamentalist and Christianity is interesting. My experiences tend to echo those of David Bellamy–I haven’t read the entire Bible twice though.

    Still this resonates for me as well, “I feel quite qualified to say that it is silly, evil, and designed to be emotionally abusive for the purpose of keeping control over people so they will keep giving money to the church.”

    I can also relate to this, “I understand intellectually that there are Xtians who do not insist on the literal truth of everything from Genesis to The Revelation of St. John the Divine, but I am always inclined to doubt their sincerity. I always suspect that they will sooner or later show their true colors and be indistinguishable from the Biblical literalists who condemn everyone who does not agree with them to eternal damnation.”

    The post that you linked too I just thought that the guy sounded angry and then that makes me wonder about his past experience. I’m not excusing his behavior either. I just tend to start analyzing what would trigger that kind of angry response, which I know is speculative. The scripture that refers to turning the other cheek, is so misused, and at least in my experience the misuse is in ways that ask a person to ignore abusive behaviors–that is how it can get twisted.

    I took my first philosophy course (mainly of eastern religions) during my freshman year and I offered some critical, but not very well-thought out comments towards Christianity which I know some other students didn’t much like. My comments were said out of anger and in response to feeling irritated at the intolerance demonstrated by some of the people at the fundamentalist church that I had been attending. And what was my crime–that I dared to take a college course on eastern religions. This motivated me to sever ties with the church and to mistrust religions in general, but unfortunately that never seemed to stop people from trying to ram their opinions down my throat on the subject.

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  19. Oh, and thanks for the links to stimming–enjoyed that one.

    “And this is the most beautiful skyline in the world. Disagree with me on this at your own peril.”

    That’s a lovely pic and the clouds are so beautiful–thank you for the link. Not to pick a fight, but as far as skylines go, I’m pretty partial to San Francisco and the Golden Gate Bridge–so beautiful with the fog rolling in. I suppose that partiality is attributed to my California girl roots.
    What can I say–it’s not that I cannot appreciate others and maybe I’m just getting a bit misty-eyed from occasional bouts of home-sickness too. It will pass.

    Like

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