Germany : The First Impressions

Do you know of this stereotype of the Germans as extremely efficient and meticulous?

Well, it’s all true. I’ve traveled quite a bit but I’ve never seen anything like this, people. Each airplane af Tegel airport has its own passport control and its own luggage line. We passed the customs in about 2 minutes and saw our suitcases in front of us already unloaded! I have got to wonder how we managed to defeat the people whose meticulousness us especially noticeable by the side of our carelessness.

The baked goods (especially the breads)Β  have stunned me. I haven’t seen such a wide variety of amazing breads in my entire life.

As you can see, I have ton of new impressions already after just 1,5 hours in Berlin.

12 thoughts on “Germany : The First Impressions”

  1. I love Germany. I was there for a week in 1999 and would love to go back. I doubt it’s in the cards, though. I would have to be able to justify it financially, and I don’t see that happening for at least ten years. Ugh.

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  2. War isn’t nice and neat and efficient — it’s chaotic and messy. I read an article somewhere (can’t remember where) about German tanks, that were marvels of engineering precision… until they broke down and were essentially unrepairable. I don’t know if that is true or not, but it sounds right. I get the feeling (from my cursory reading–World War 2 isn’t something I’ve studied intensively) that the Nazis were winning as long as people were just being intimidated by their precisely engineered, meticulously-planned war machine, but once people started fighting back with everything they had they fell apart.

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    1. The idea of the iron war machine probably comes from the american side of the war. The US mainly relied on M4 Sherman medium tanks. While equal to german designs, mainly the Panzer III, at first, the Nazis quickly adopted design improvements they pretty much stole from soviet tank designs and improved their medium class tanks, the Panzer IV and the Panther, with it. Additionally to that, the US forces only deployed heavy tanks at the very end of the war, which means that for quite some time, they had no match for the german heavies, the Tiger and the Tiger II.

      But you are right about the precisely engineered and meticulously planned war machine. Especially both heavy tanks were somewhat overplanned and suffered from several issues that mainly originated from wanting too much and making things way too complicated.

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  3. I have got to wonder how we managed to defeat the people whose meticulousness us especially noticeable by the side of our carelessness.

    I am curious regarding what predicate this “we” refers to: Soviets? Russians? Russians and Ukranians, etc.? Americans? Canadians? All of the above? The “Allies” in general?

    [I may be reading too deeply. πŸ˜‰ ]

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  4. I haven’t seen such a wide variety of amazing breads in my entire life.

    German bread, in quality and variety is second to none. The Economist did an informal survey about a decade ago and found dozens of varieties that were readily available.

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      1. I can’t eat it any more, but French bread is good too, and Italian. European brad in general tbh. You can get similar bread in the UK but it’s harder to find and very expensive. My da makes his own now because he really can’t be doing with most supermarket bread – he can bore on for hours about the Chorleywood Bread Process if you let him.
        I have never had decent bread in the US although I’m sure it must be available. I believe it’s something to do with the wheat varieties they use for flour.

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