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Clarissa's Blog

An academic's opinions on feminism, politics, literature, philosophy, teaching, academia, and a lot more.

The Bauman Collection 

Zygmunt Bauman died this past January. I found out about it from a student’s presentation and almost burst down in tears. It’s very inconsiderate of Bauman to just go and die on us right when the world is ready to hear what he’s been saying for decades. He could have taken a better care of his health and not smoked like a chimney, for instance. His life didn’t belong just to himself. And yes, he was 91 when he died, so what? 91, 101 – he could have dragged it out first the sake of humanity. 

This is turning into an unwelcome trend. First, novelist Rafael Chirbes kicks the bucket way too early. Then philosopher Ulrich Beck bites it prematurely. And now it’s lights out on Bauman. And if I sound not too serious about it, that’s because I’m too upset to be serious. 

I have decided to start a Bauman collection. I’m buying and reading everything he’s written  (that has been translated into English, of course.) If there’s no more Bauman to provide insights (and nobody else of his stature I know of), I’ll have to become a Bauman onto myself and figure shit out for myself.

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4 thoughts on “The Bauman Collection 

  1. DWeird on said:

    I went to a public lecture of his a good number of years ago back in Lithuania, which I think he mostly did as a favour to Leonidas Donskis, one of the best public intellectuals we’ve produced – sadly now also dead.

    There was a nearly concert hall sized room filled to the brim and bursting with all the people who came there to listen to him talk on the nature of violence in modernity. I remember wanting to fiercely debate him on every point he made while also feeling a great disparity on the level of learning I’d need to achieve to even try.

    Most of his audience then were people in their twenties, so they’ll be reaching an age where they can actually do something with what they’ve learned.

    He made an impact, and you are not alone.

    Like

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