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Clarissa's Blog

An academic's opinions on feminism, politics, literature, philosophy, teaching, academia, and a lot more.

What Makes Me Angry

A profound transformation of our very state-form is occurring. A new form of global capitalism is being created. The Liberals (progressives, the left wing, whatever) studiously pretend nothing is happening and everything is peachy gooey. I like Hillary, I supported her, but let’s not pretend like it wasn’t the most out of touch campaign in the world. (After Bernie’s, I mean).

People intuit, however, that something is not right. Their anxiety is exploited by a cunning and immoral billionaire who is propelled to power by simply acknowledging that something is going on and the people’s anxiety is real. 

The Liberals (progressives, the left wing, whatever) look at all this and decide that the way to deal with the situation is to mask the symptom and pretend there is no disease. Remove Trump and we can all go on pretending that more and more people will need disability or some other form of UBI simply because they are eager to “try out new ideas” and not because the new form of capitalism has turned them into human waste. We can all go on pretending that toilet signage is our greatest social justice cause and big business is supporting it because it suddenly became super progressive.
Kushner, schmushner, the most enormous planetary transformation we are to witness in our lifetimes is underway, and this is what we are on about? 

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11 thoughts on “What Makes Me Angry

  1. It’s a problem when the out-of-power adopt the “loyal opposition” model — wanting change but not too much change. What you’re describing is a paradigm shift in politics and most are no more willing to accept that right now than the Church was to accept Gallileo’s findings. The question becomes: what event will make acceptance of the new paradigm unavoidable?

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  2. Stringer Bell on said:

    “People intuit, however, that something is not right. Their anxiety is exploited by a cunning and immoral billionaire..”

    Bernie’s entire campaign was about this. Hell, his entire political career is about this. Too bad he couldn’t win the primary.

    He is, by far, the most popular politician in the US. Even now. The issues he talks about still resonate with everyone, except the Democratic party leadership.

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    • Stringer Bell on said:

      The point being that screaming ‘America is already great’ to a mass of people who intuit something is not right is only going to drive them away, ready to be exploited by someone else.

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    • el on said:

      \ Bernie’s entire campaign was about this. Hell, his entire political career is about this.

      After reading wiki’s entry for “Bernie Sanders presidential campaign, 2016,” I received a confirmation of my (probably wrong?) impression that Bernie’s campaign was about “this,” if “this” means “rhetoric for workers’ rights which gave us minimum wage, worker unions and so on several decades ago.”

      However, if “this” is supposed to mean “a profound transformation of our very state-form,” I have missed it. Has Bernie contributed something new to the discussion? When?

      His stance on immigration seems to show the opposite:

      \ Sanders : “It does not make a lot of sense to me to bring hundreds of thousands of [foreign] workers into this country to work for minimum wage and compete with American kids.” Sanders opposed guest worker programs and was also skeptical about skilled immigrant (H-1B) visas, saying, “Last year, the top 10 employers of H-1B guest workers were all offshore outsourcing companies. These firms are responsible for shipping large numbers of American information technology jobs to India and other countries.”

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      • Stringer Bell on said:

        “However, if “this” is supposed to mean “a profound transformation of our very state-form..”

        You’re right. He hasn’t talked about this. No one has. He’s talked about the second order effects of this transformation, which is income inequality, erosion of worker rights, etc.

        But even bringing those issues to the fore was radical for this country. And it’s happened so fast.

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        • el on said:

          \ He’s talked about the second order effects of this transformation, which is income inequality, erosion of worker rights, etc.

          The problem with it was that it seemed to me (and probably to some Americans too) that he was offering “copy paste” of old solutions to deal with new problems. And I do not think it is a correct approach in the long term.

          Hasn’t he talked about new issues because he thought it was the best strategy to win an election OR because he is either unaware of the complexity of new situation or unable to think of anything new? Bernie created the impression of somebody who says what he thinks, so I lean to the second possibility.

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          • Stringer Bell on said:

            ““copy paste” of old solutions to deal with new problems”

            Shoring up the welfare state to delay the (almost) inevitable, while smarter people think of solutions is not the worst idea in the world. Especially when we know the other side’s agenda: dismantling the apparatus of the state, gutting education, environmental protections, and so on.

            He’s a politician, not a policy expert. ‘Bring back manufacturing jobs’ was just bad, even though it was extremely popular (Trump ran on it in the general and won).

            No politician in the US, or abroad for that matter, seems to have a vision on how to deal with the economy of the future. I think they all know about it, but are too chicken to say it. Can you imagine the backlash from the public towards the first leader who openly admits the problems inherent in late capitalism? Nobody wants to bell that cat.

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      • adrianaurelien on said:

        Agreed. Tim Ryan has done a much better job talking about this. He tackles the harsh reality that automation and globalization are leaving behind many people, instead of just talking about income inequality, greedy rich people, and free college. I liked most of the things Bernie was offering, but none of it was anything special, it’s the same stuff progressives have been parroting my entire life.

        http://timryanforcongress.com/issues/jobs/
        http://timryanforcongress.com/ (go to “A New Direction”)

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  3. Shakti on said:

    Would you concede that freaking out about toilets is a symptom of fluidity anxiety?
    [Why does that sound like a euphemism for bladder problems in a drug commercial?]

    Kushner, schmushner, the most enormous planetary transformation we are to witness in our lifetimes is underway, and this is what we are on about?
    Some spoiled vengeful billionaire who only acts to enrich himself and his family without regard to the nation seems very apropos to freaking out about the nation state disintegrating. It’s not like they cared much before, but it’s very in your face now and it’s happening in a strong nation state and not a weak one like say, Guatemala in the 1950s.

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    • “Would you concede that freaking out about toilets is a symptom of fluidity anxiety?”

      • Absolutely! This is why the people who experience shouldn’t be shut up and shamed with yelps of “Bigot! You want to murder me by not sharing your potty!”

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  4. adrianaurelien on said:

    This is why I barely participate in the Hillary group I’m a part of anymore. We got along well during the election, but at this point I’m tired of them whining about “stupid rednecks” and saying people need to suck it up and find new jobs (that was just one guy, but it was astonishing; “why wouldn’t they want to learn how to code and become programmers?”) Yet they unironically call Republicans uncompassionate. The Bernie supporters on my facebook aren’t any better. The best I see from most Dems is the condescending “these salt of the earth folk don’t know what’s best for them; poor souls!” reaction that I’ve always hated (but it comes from a good place.)

    I’ve found about 5 people I enjoy discussing national politics with total, not including my parents. Democratic politicians are often out of touch, but it’s the voters who are really nasty and hateful. I’m guessing almost no Trump supporters will come to our side because of all the vitriol and I don’t blame them one bit; who wants to join a group of people that hate you?

    Also, glad to see you still like Hillary! Not sure why that makes me happy, but it does. Just because her campaign wasn’t good doesn’t mean we can’t admire what she’s done.

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