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Clarissa's Blog

An academic's opinions on feminism, politics, literature, philosophy, teaching, academia, and a lot more.

Sociophobia

My new hobby is to sell things on the local FB page. The way it’s done in this area is very typical and never fails to freak out newcomers to the region. The way it’s set up is so that human contact is avoided as much as possible. You are supposed to leave whatever you are selling on the porch. Buyers will pick it up and leave money under the mat.

If you see people approach and come out to say hi, they get very spooked and react like you’ve committed a huge social faux pas. Sellers prefer to risk never getting any money (because nothing is to prevent buyers from not leaving money under the mat) if it lets them avoid exchanging a few words with human beings. 

Of course, I like finding cash under the mat every once in a while but it’s still creepy how scared people are of human contact. I mean, for me to find it excessive, it’s really got to be something quite notable.

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17 thoughts on “Sociophobia

  1. Dreidel on said:

    It sounds to me like a good way to get property stolen off your porch, especially if you advertise its location on FB.

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    • The good thing is that everybody is so reluctant to come close that you can leave anything on the porch very safely. We’ve had Fedex deliver a $3,000 laptop and just let it sit on the porch all day. The driver left a note saying he knew a signature was needed but he just signed for us.

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  2. Dreidel on said:

    “The driver left a note saying he knew a signature was needed but he just signed for us.”

    You should have told FedEx that it was stolen because their driver’s incompetent laziness, and then filed a claim for $3,000. 🙂

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    • You are in a Christmas mood already, as I can see. 🙂

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    • That’s mean and unethical. As in fraudulent, which I believe is a felony. Are you one of those who believes the hungry are just faking to cheat on “welfare”? I mean: I do keep on hearing of this kind of scheme from the very same people who accuse others of “cheating” — schemes I wouldn’t even dream up. What is with that?

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      • Dreidel on said:

        “That’s mean and unethical. As in fraudulent, which I believe is a felony. Are you one of those who believes the hungry are just faking to cheat on ‘welfare’?”

        Are you one of those who can’t tell when a comment is a joke, even when a smiley face is attached to it?

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        • Smiley face did not show in my browser. And I know too many people who say exactly this with a straight face, and are offended if I take it as a joke, so no, I can no longer tell or perhaps more accurately, this can’t be funny to me because of how many people I have to hear say it who do not mean it as a joke at all.

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          • Dreidel on said:

            Actually, I’m scrupulously honest, and I expect the merchants who deal with me to adhere to the same standards.

            Five years ago, I ordered a box of 25 Christmas cards from the National Geographic Society. When the box arrived, I immediately counted the cards. The Society had shorted me two cards, sending only 23. So of course I called them and informed the Society that it owed me two more cards. Since it wouldn’t have been cost-efficient for them to open a box and send me only two cards, they simply sent me a brand new, still-sealed box of identical cards.

            The new box had exactly 25 cards (I counted) — so being a honest consumer got me 48 cards for the price of 25.

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      • Come on Z, this was joke all the way.

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  3. I’m not fond of human interaction and I really find that odd. Maybe the fear is that someone you buy something from will turn out to be a serial killer and drag you into their home? But then, you don’t exactly need to go to a private residence to pick up something if it’s something you can carry.

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  4. Shakti on said:

    The way it’s done in this area is very typical and never fails to freak out newcomers to the region. The way it’s set up is so that human contact is avoided as much as possible. You are supposed to leave whatever you are selling on the porch. Buyers will pick it up and leave money under the mat.

    If one wishes to avoid human contact, do people not have the wherewithal to set up paypal accounts or send a check through the post? Why does meeting people in a public place (for something small) freak people out more than some random stranger knowing where you live? Why in the world would they use Facebook if putting a face to a name is so freaky? Isn’t that what Craigslist is for?

    OT:

    Why do the same people say “It’s so safe here we can leave all the doors and windows open” and “OMG THE ENTIRE WORLD IS TRYING TO KILL US, WE NEED ALL THE GUNS AND WE NEED TO CARRY THEM EVERYWHERE.”

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  5. One needs to watch that “human contact” stuff.
    …might end up becoming the subject of somebody’s Me Too post.

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