NYTimes: If You Could Add One Book to the High School Curriculum, What Would It Be?

I agree with the person who suggested the Bible. It would make my job much easier, that’s why.

I haven’t read any of the others except for Zinn’s People’s History, and that was crap on a stick.

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6 thoughts on “NYTimes: If You Could Add One Book to the High School Curriculum, What Would It Be?”

  1. I agree with the person who suggested the Bible. It would make my job much easier, that’s why.
    Of course. But then you don’t have to deal with the endless freak outs from people at the idea of treating the Bible as literature not religion.
    I’m not sure whether the freakouts would be lesser or equal to teaching the Koran as literature not religion.

    I read Gilgamesh in a high school history class. We should’ve really read August Wilson’s Fences since it was by a local author and it won a Pulitzer Prize but our English teacher barely managed to explain Taming of the Shrew [“you have to really believe this is feminist, please stop arguing with me in class” was the gist of her explanation] or Invisible Man.

    But I really do know Antigone since I read no less than three times in high school and college!

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  2. I understand your reasoning but … that would have been terrible for me (if it involved actual reading). I can no more read holy texts than I can fly or hold my breath for three hours. Breakdown of the history and structure of the Bible (and Torah and Koran) yes! I would have benefited from that. Reading more than the tiniest of excerpts? … nyah

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  3. Since we’re talking about a high school curriculum, not college, I suggest “How to Win friends and influence people“ by Dale Carnegie. It might teach highschoolers a little bit about how to get along peacefully in everyday life, and how to succeed at work and in relationships.

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