Childhood Traumas

Yesterday, very few people came to my garage sale. But they bought the most expensive stuff, netting me almost $300.

Today a lot of people came but they bought really cheap stuff, bringing in $26.

I’m still a lot happier today than I was yesterday because yesterday I felt really unpopular when I sat there alone and nobody was showing up.

4 thoughts on “Childhood Traumas”

  1. Why worry about your popularity when you got so well-paid for a few hours’ work?

    Take the cash and let the credit go.

    Like

      1. OMG me, too. I am still super sensitive to hints that people don’t want me around, and I make myself scarce before I am faced with outright rejection. This probably means I often come across as aloof and disinterested because I am overprotective of myself, but it’s hard to shake the feeling I’m not welcome (probably not even true every time), followed by wanting to do everyone a favor and get lost.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Heh. I feel lucky now. I was unpopular as a kid also, but so socially oblivious that I mostly didn’t notice it. I only realized later that I had no friends at school, and actually nobody talked to me there unless a group assignment forced them to. It was a gut-punch when I figured it out, but I got over it.

          I’m EXTREMELY sensitive to any hint of dishonesty, though. I never could tell when people were lying to me, and was a very credulous child. People– siblings, adults– found it both easy, and hilarious, to exploit this… with the result that I now assume everyone could be lying all the time, and spend inordinate effort on social risk assessment: if this person isn’t being honest, what’s at risk? How do I protect myself? But it’s kind of a bummer not being able to trust most people.

          Probably the #1 most attractive thing about my husband is that, like me, he is congenitally incapable of lying. It makes him so nice to be around.

          Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.