Never Again

I don’t want to go into unnecessary physiological detail, but never again am I eating fake meat. That people eat it to improve their health is deeply bizarre.

13 thoughts on “Never Again

  1. I don’t understand the desire to imitate meat. If one wants to go vegan/vegetarian it is better to stick to recipes and cuisines that cater to vegetarians. I don’t understand why people would want to eat processed goop.

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  2. I have had this experience with Garden Burgers, back when I was a vegetarian (my roommate cooked them, I tried it to be polite). It was at that point that I realized that, if you’re going to do the vegetarian thing, it’s best to stick to dishes vetted by centuries of vegetarians– India and Souteast Asia particularly have well-developed vegetarian subcultures with a lovely array of delicious recipes to learn– and not go tinkering around with things that are meant to imitate meat. If you don’t want to eat meat, don’t eat meat. And don’t pretend to do it just for funsies either: it’s not worth the digestive pyrotechnics!

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  3. Well, the fact is, it’s an ideological thing. Most humans respond to the smell and taste of meat. Some in the vegetarian but more especially in the vegan world have come to realize how difficult it is to wean people away from such a primary predilection and have thought up the idea of foods imitating meat: veggie burgers, sausages and the like.
    Plus, the super well-intentioned and super misguided people dreaming up a brave new world for the rest of us think that we should all eat fake meat in the future – while they of course sink their fangs into the real thing! And they call it progress.

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    1. “super misguided people dreaming up a brave new world for the rest of us think that we should all eat fake meat in the future”
      These things are systemic! Greatas and Klauses have their agenda and Monsanto has its agenda and at times they kind of coincide.
      I remember in the late 1970s the commercial music industry was stuck – they couldn’t charge more for vinyl records (without tanking sales) and so they looked into other ways of increasing the sticker price and eventually found the CD.
      It’s the same with food now. It’s hard to charge more so they’re trying to raise prices by changing the media – in this case from real food (plant and animal) and replacing it with highly processed industrial sludge with a larger mark up.
      I’m not the first to notice or point this out but it’s pretty clear when you look at it.
      I’m not sure I entirely agree with the idea that they’re pushing eating bugs in the media as a way of making the industrial sludge more appealing….

      Liked by 2 people

      1. A better example would be margarine, which is just cheap imitation butter but was marketed as a health food. This led to the so-called French paradox since the French were able to eat butter without damaging their health. Of course there was no paradox since there was never anything wrong with butter in the first place.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. ” cheap imitation butter but was marketed as a health food”

          I remember hearing old time radio shows (local NPR program) and there was an add for margarine that went on quite a long time about a dye pack). The announcer later explained that early margarine was white and came with a little yellow dye to color it (more yellow than butter though now apparently butter is dyed to look like margarine)

          https://thesocietypages.org/socimages/2011/09/22/the-politics-of-yellow/

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          1. Butter can be that yellow naturally, but only certain times of year, and only if they’re out eating fresh green forage in the pasture. You can’t get that color naturally with cows eating grain/silage/hay in the barn.

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  4. I don’t eat fake meat if I can help it, and I’m a vegetarian. If it’s a veggie burger or nothing, I’ll go ahead, but I can’t imagine anyone thinking it’s healthy.

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