Live with the Consequences

The bastard intelligently waited for the Republicans to ef up the recall and then came out with this:

I couldn’t care less because my kid isn’t getting this shot under any circumstances. But I feel for the people affected.

P.S. I don’t think there are any completely uninformed people reading the blog but for just in case, here’s a simple, easy to understand explanation why the COVID vaccine isn’t “just like” the regular childhood vaccines. Most importantly, since kids aren’t at risk from COVID and the protection lasts for a few months only, it’s downright criminal to force it into children.

34 thoughts on “Live with the Consequences

  1. “kids aren’t at risk from COVID”

    Irrelevant. This is about establishing ownership of children (I’m not writing metaphorically here). In the new neoliberal bio-state (or whatever it’s going to be called) children are resources to be mined like coal.
    The more kids get the vaccine the more money Pfizer makes…

    For what it’s worth I don’t think the mrna vaccines actually do much of anything good or bad for most people – it’s about establishing full spectrum dominance over the citizenry and a new model of healthcare that consists of shoveling taxpayer money to big Pharma while most other healthcare is simply eliminated for the non-wealthy…

    If you thought Canadian healthcare sucked, then in the words of the Canadian rock group Bachman Turner Overdrive….. you ain’t seen nothing yet.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Healthcare and schooling. Tomorrow there will be something else, and so on. CRT in schools is another version of COVID vaccine mandates. It’s all about pushing as many people out as possible.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Broad chorus of some leftists and all libertarians: We want the end of the nation state!!!!!
        Powers that be: Okay….
        Broad chorus of some leftists and all libertarians: No…. not like that!

        Liked by 3 people

  2. I saw it this morning. There is no way I am getting these “vaccines” into my children. I have been calling up contacts in red and purple states, and going on the job market this year. Worst comes to the worst, I will home-school.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. You and a lot of other people. I have been seeing a lot of comments from people who got the vaccine to keep their jobs, but who are “over my dead body” about getting it for their kids. I don’t think people are going to be quite as compliant with this round.

      Just remember: they’ve already set up the “minors can make their own medical decisions without their parents” pathway. It sounded ok when it was about 17-year-olds getting abortions and the Pill without notifying their evil religious-cultist parents… now you and I are the evil cultist parents.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. I personally know an elderly man who had an auto-immune reaction from the vaccine. He had to stay in the hospital for 10 days. I also know a middle-aged woman who had 103 fever for close to a week after the second shot, and a 17 year old who had myocarditis. So people are having adverse effects, whether you know about them or not.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. I personally know of several women experiencing violent disruptions of their menstrual cycles, and every one of these women know other women experiencing the same adverse reactions. This on top of the thousands of documented cases of blood clots, heart inflammation (in teenagers) etc. You don’t “see or hear of anybody” because you don’t want to and you’ve set your media settings to “Anti vaxxers must die”. (I’m vaxxed for what it’s worth). We will pull our child out of school if this insanity spreads from California and a lot of other folks where I live will too. There will be real pushback, finally, on this one.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Unfortunately, I now know somebody who has developed an untreatable chronic endocrine condition. She’s 38. She’s now disabled for life. This is a person who was at virtually no risk from COVID.

        Liked by 1 person

    3. It depends on the age of the people in your circle. It seems that the 50+ crowd rarely has serious symptoms. But if you ask women of childbearing age, it’s a whole different picture. Among people I know, the 70+ crowd is fine while the 30+ people. . . not so much. And this is before we have any idea of long-term effects.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Pretty much my entire family and all friends in their 30s are vaccinated without any adverse effects. This includes a 12 year old.
        I also have Latin American, European, and Asian friends vaccinated without any problems.

        Sorry to hear so many others had bad effects. Wonder what might be different.

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    4. Me. Me. I had an adverse reaction from the first dose. I am still having it. It’s looking more and more like small vessel vasculitis and it’s affecting the muscles in my left arm. I’m seeing an immunologist for treatment as soon as I can get an appointment. I also have cervical lymphadenopathy that should have disappeared by now, as well as abdominal pain, nausea, and assorted persistent auto-inflammation and fatigue. Also weird petechiae that won’t go away or stop spreading.

      My mom still has severe distortion of taste and smell from the first dose seven months ago. And my aunt had severe axial lymphadenopathy for several months.

      These are confirmed as adverse events by providers. Let alone the cardiovascular issues, particularly in young men. The blood clotting issues. Guillain-Barré. Menstrual disruptions. There have been several very high profile adverse events.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. @ Pen:

        I would be very interested to know how the vasculitis and petechiae respond to monoclonal antibody treatment, or if your immunologist has tried administering them to a person experiencing your symptoms.

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        1. Right now I’m playing phone tag trying to get an appointment, but I can definitely ask.

          I’m not sure how well monoclonal antibodies would work on such a patient who is also a long-covid patient, as I am—and this is the first I’ve heard of using it with patients who have adverse reactions to the vaccine. Have you seen any studies looking at this? The treatments I’ve seen for the vasculitis patients has all been limited to steroids.

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          1. “I’m not sure how well monoclonal antibodies would work on such a patient who is also a long-covid patient, as I am”

            From your post, I thought that you were suffering form a vaccine reaction, not long-covid.

            Anyway, I have not heard of anyone using monoclonal antibodies on a patient with a vaccine reaction, but in my opinion, it might help or even solve the problem, particularly if the patient is suffering from things like vasculitis.

            My reasoning is that the vaccine has been shown to move away from the injection site through the circulatory system. That was in the translated Japanese Pfizer biodistribution study that I posted here last week or so.

            We know that the vaccine will enter endothelial cells, and cause expression of the spike protein on the surface of those endothelial cells.

            Logically, that would cause entanglment of blood cells particularly in the smaller vessels, as well as, potentially, the immune system attacking the endothelium expressing spike proteins so as to cause vasculitis as a consequence.

            What I suspect is that monoclonal antibody therapy should cause antibodies to bind to and possibly neutralise the spike proteins expressed on the endothelium, and so lessen or eliminate both blood cell entanglement and/or the autoimmune reaction.

            The above just popped into my mind when I was reading your post though, so please don’t take it as it were some tried and tested therapy. It just makes sense to me.

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              1. “The thought is that they’re likely related in my case.”

                May I ask where this idea came from? Both the virus and the vaccine can independently produce those symptoms. I don’t see any reason for both of those things being present and related being necessary to explain the facts.

                The question is meant nicely by the way. For some reason the above paragraph sounds really mean, when it is in no way intended to be so.

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    5. “I’ve yet to see or hear of anybody having adverse effects from the vaccines.”

      A few weeks ago, a friend in her mid 30s messaged to let me know that she was in line to get the vaccine. At the time, she was the second person I personally knew to receive it.

      A day or two later she was hospitalised. Despite my being a health professional and her asking them several times, the hospital would not release her blood work.

      Generally, hospitals invent reasons and otherwise abuse process to deny releasing records when the records say something bad and/or there is some kind of liability issue.

      Another woman I know aged about 60 received her first dose because she wanted to visit family overseas. She was hospitalised for several days, nearly died, and was told that she was not to receive a second shot.

      Yet another woman I know in her early 30s had a reaction that she thought was a flare up of a pre existing severe auto immune condition that she has. Her autoimmune condition and common COVID vaccine side effects overlap significantly. It is reasonable to say that a flare up of her condition was precipitated by the vaccine, or that she had a vaccine reaction outright. I lean 90% to the latter.

      At a guess, I’d say that 25% of people I know to have had the vaccine have had a significant reaction requiring medical attention.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. If I had a young child, I would do whatever I could to ensure that he/she got Covid. Kids are statistically at zero risk from Covid, and once they’ve had it, they have lifelong immunity — meaning they won’t catch it as adults, when it’s a little riskier (although not nearly as risky as we have been led to believe).

    When I was a kid, there were no vaccines for measles, mumps, rubella, or chicken pox. Everyone got them, no one suffered any permanent ill effects, and all of us developed lifelong immunity. Now most kids get vaccinated for these diseases and almost no one gets them in childhood. But the protection wears off, so to maintain immunity you have to have regular booster shots. If you fail to get the booster and contract one of these diseases as an adult, you could be in serious trouble. MMR and chicken pox vaccines took relatively harmless childhood diseases and made them far more dangerous. Now they’re doing the same thing with Covid.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The chickenpox story is more complicated than that. Varicella stays with you, and can be re-activated by stress so that you get shingles, later. I had chickenpox as a toddler and shingles at 9 (not since, thank goodness!)(had a heckuva time getting a diagnosis, too, because “kids don’t get shingles”).

      So on the surface it seems like a good idea to vaccinate for that, to prevent shingles later. But as you say: hardly anyone keeps getting the boosters after childhood, which increases the risk of people contracting varicella as adults, when it’s more dangerous. And also, for people like me, who already had chickenpox and are carrying it around… occasional re-exposure to someone with chickenpox can be protective against shingles outbreaks. It’s like even though you have the dormant virus in your nerve cells, your immune system benefits from the occasional reminder. Which it doesn’t get if all your kids/grandkids are vaccinated, or you just never hang out with kids.

      There’s a very complex viral/immune ecosystem there, that vaccinating disrupts.

      Liked by 2 people

    2. I had measles, mumps and chicken pox as a kid. None of it was a big deal. I got to stay home from school, which was great. I also had whooping cough.

      I had to get vaccinated for all of these as an adult TWICE to be accepted by the higher ed system in Canada and then the US. Cause, you know, science. Then I had to get vaccinated for whooping cough again when I was pregnant. I must be the most immune person on the planet by now.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I didn’t get to miss school for any of that stuff, because I’d had almost every childhood disease there was before I started kindergarten. My immune system was amazing. I almost never missed school due to illness.

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        1. Ditto here. I was bummed when my classmates came down with chickenpox and returned with tales of eating ice cream and watching TV all day. I had older siblings, so I’d already had it when their whole girl scout troop came down with it.

          Liked by 1 person

  4. Why doesn’t everyone who is worried about the mRNA vaccines get the J&J vax? It’s a traditional vaccine. If I have to vaccinate my kids that’s what I’ll wait for.

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    1. I personally don’t get it because I already had COVID. My kid isn’t getting it because children are at no risk from COVID. I’m against medicating kids at all, unless they are seriously ill.

      Americans dramatically overmedicate children.

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  5. “May I ask where this idea came from? Both the virus and the vaccine can independently produce those symptoms. I don’t see any reason for both of those things being present and related being necessary to explain the facts.”

    -My long-COVID manifested as primarily auto-inflammatory symptoms — my body never relearned how to regulate cytokine production, which causes cyclic joint pain, brain fog, and post-exertional malaise (but no vasculitis). The symptoms of my vaccine reaction are entirely different but similarly auto-inflammatory — my primary care provider believes they may be related but not necessarily directly causative. Because I had autoimmune and autoinflammatory issues due to COVID in the first place, my body was already predisposed to overreact to the spike protein — and was probably already attacking my own cells based on molecular mimicry.

    Unfortunately, it’s impossible to tell if I would have gotten vasculitis if I had not had long-COVID. But so far that’s the hypothesis, particularly because I had expressed concerns about such a reaction before getting the vaccine.

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    1. Hang on. I’m not sure where a lot of this is coming from either. Just taking it one thing at a time:

      “my body never relearned how to regulate cytokine production”

      Which test or tests led to this determination? Note that interferon gamma can have an effect here.

      “which causes … brain fog”

      I’m not so sure. Neurons can be invaded by the virus directly and harmed that way. No need for cytokines.

      “Because I had autoimmune and autoinflammatory issues due to COVID in the first place, my body was already predisposed to overreact to the spike protein”

      ADE, yes.

      “and was probably already attacking my own cells based on molecular mimicry.”

      You mean presence of an antigen subsequent to and produced by infection. Sure. Ongoing sub clinical infection/acute breakthrough would do it too.

      “Unfortunately, it’s impossible to tell if I would have gotten vasculitis if I had not had long-COVID.”

      True. That shouldn’t matter though, since if you have it now it might be treatable now. If it is mediated by spike proteins then neutralising them might give enough respite to allow for healing.

      Anyway all that aside, do you feel comfortable mentioning how you know that cytokine production isn’t properly regulated, or talking about this at all? I didn’t mean to start a full blown intervention type thing 🙂

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      1. Believe me, I wouldn’t be talking about it if I didn’t want to. :p

        There is a preprint that details increased levels of specific cytokines in long-COVID patients with chronic fatigue-like symptoms—the title is “Immunological dysfunction persists for 8 months following initial mild-moderate SARS-CoV-2 infection.” My own providers haven’t done a lot of bloodwork, but a lot of tests are unavailable for non-research patients in my area. And no one is doing this research in my area, naturally.

        Cadaver studies on hospitalized covid patients found high levels of INFs and cytokines in the brain tissue, which I believe is where the search regarding cytokines comes from.

        I will admit that I don’t know anything for sure. Outside of traveling to join a study, the chances of me ever knowing with certainty are very low. So I’ve been doing a lot of reading of papers, but I know my interpretation may not always be accurate, so I really do welcome the discussion.

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        1. “Believe me, I wouldn’t be talking about it if I didn’t want to. :p”

          Just checking 🙂

          “There is a preprint that details increased levels of specific cytokines…”

          Found it, read it.

          So that I can be clear, you said in an earlier post “-My long-COVID manifested as primarily auto-inflammatory symptoms — my body never relearned how to regulate cytokine production, which causes cyclic joint pain, brain fog, and post-exertional malaise (but no vasculitis).” and have also said “My own providers haven’t done a lot of bloodwork, but a lot of tests are unavailable for non-research patients in my area…”

          May I ask if your provider has ordered blood tests for you, examined the results, and stated to you that your body did not re-learn how to regulate cytokine production etc. or if you were speaking generally or had come to that conclusion yourself?

          By the way the simplest explanation for ongoing elevation of cytokines is simply ongoing subclinical or undetected infection. As a multi system multi organ virus, it is quite easy for the virus to be active somewhere in your body where only a biopsy or something could detect it, causing your immune system to constantly produce cytokines.

          A disease called melioidosis is similar in this regard and causes the same confusion, since it can affect only a single organ at a time, causing localised abscesses that don’t show up on any scans. As a practitioner your only clue is an increased white cell count which can be caused by nearly anything. The preprint you linked put me in mind of that.

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