Painfully Slow

The funny thing is that nobody said anything of the kind. Pfizer was very clear back in January that it wasn’t supposed to stop transmission. Anybody with half a brain cell could see why there was no scientific mechanism for it to stop transmission. Nobody promised an end to restrictions either.

People just assumed. They assumed that consenting to coercion would bring freedom. Instead, it brought more coercion.

Will they learn now?

Don’t get me wrong, I’m glad that (some) normies are figuring things out. I want to be more patient with their mournful, confused bleatings. But it’s hard. It’s been two years, and it’s only dawning on them now how this works? And only on a few of them?

“But how could they do this to us? We trusted them? How could they?”

It’s painful to watch. Give them another decade and maybe they’ll clock on to the fact that everybody is out for themselves and if you don’t defend your interests, no one else will.

11 thoughts on “Painfully Slow

  1. New York State very quickly put the lie in writing. “This is approved to prevent infection and transmission with COVID-19.” It was in all the paperwork—not the very first, when it was only healthcare workers, but by February or March when the first non-healthcare workers were eligible that was what the paperwork said.

    So at least some people must have gotten the full brunt of the lie.

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      1. A416 isn’t eligible for a vote anywhere, thank god—I’d have to check the status of each of the others, though. The rest are scary enough on their own.

        As for STD shots…do they mean antibiotic treatment?

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            1. From the text it says diagnosis, care, and treatment. Which makes sense. You should not need parental consent to be treated for syphilis.
              It’s purely limited to that—text mentions nothing regarding vaccinations.

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              1. Could be. I don’t follow your logic about not needing consent, though. Any logic that allows minors to receive non-emergency medical care without parents’ say-so can also be bent to allow minors to get any kind of medical intervention without consulting their parents. I understand the reasons, but I don’t think it’s a sound decision.

                Liked by 2 people

  2. But Clarissa, there is deeper redemptive ontology at play here. Everyone isn’t simply out for themselves, we aren’t all simply defending our own interests, almost all of us are deeply concerned with one another.. Empathy, friendship, romance, eros are real. Love exists.

    When people talk about God, I think this is what we mean, personal reality suffuses, bounds, binds, defines everything. This personal symbiosis gives our lives, our desires, our suffering, our deaths meaning. Personal mystery consumes everything. We Christians say that faith in this hope is salvific.. I think what we mean is that faith (trust) and hope are anticipations of transcendent Love.

    I’m re-reading what I just wrote. It’s inadequate. I’m a brutally poor poet, Clarissa. Forgive my repeatedly disfiguring your combox.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. This reminds me of a scene from Animal House (1978) where Flounder is crying because the fraternity members trashed his brother’s car. Otter says to him, “You (bleeped) up. You trusted us!” Same thing applies here.

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  4. No, it’s more Unconditional Positivism and Magical Thinking.

    The magic they wanted was to believe if they accepted an experimental treatment, they would get benefits from it and somehow avoid any harm, plus they’d be given their freedom “back” in some way.

    Essentially they wanted to rush the first notional “exit” that appeared.

    It’s because these people couldn’t handle the psychological stresses of being “locked in” without the possibility of an “exit” appearing that offers an orderly way out of the situation.

    So these people imagined that the people offering treatments were offering these “exits”.

    仕方がない。

    I’m not locked in with them, they’re locked in with me. 🙂

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