Facial Recognition

The lead actor in True Detective, Season 2 shaved his moustache mid-season, and I didn’t recognize him. Watched in complete confusion for 15 minutes. It’s almost like a disability I have.

12 thoughts on “Facial Recognition

  1. I have that problem as well. People at work change their hair and it sometimes takes me a very long time to recognize them. I’ve had issues with Halloween costumes as well. It’s like I know I should know this person but I can’t figure out who it is.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. ” I didn’t recognize him”

    I have a friend who’s the total opposite, he recognized an actress from the Danish series Borgen who had a small part on Game of Thrones even though her hair color was changed, there were no close-ups in GoT and she was speaking a different language….

    I (barely) recognized her only because I’d read about her being cast…

    Like

  3. You’re not the only one! I have a ridiculously hard time keeping people sorted out, in real life, if they change hairstyle, makeup, or facial hair. As a kid, it was not unusual for me to get lost in shops because I thoughtlessly followed someone with hair similar to my mother’s.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I have a colleague with face blindness. He doesn’t even try to recognize people passing him by. I believe he relies on voice and context to recognize people. He says that, to him, it’s not at all surprising that no one could recognize Superman when he put his glasses on and “disguised” as Clark Kent.

    This is fascinating to me because I’m the opposite and have a really good ability to discern and memorize faces. I think it’s connected with the ability to draw.

    Like

  5. I wonder, is it linked to the fact that we read too much and are very attuned to verbal cues (including but not limited to metaphor, simile, sound effects, phonetic and phonological idiosyncrasies, puns, semantic range, all this in multiple languages) while unable to distinguish even the most basic facial features?

    Liked by 1 person

      1. You’ve said before you’re an INTJ, but …

        … have you considered the possibility that you’re really an INFJ that’s been mistyped, and that all of the INTJ habits are over-compensating for the traits that people think you should have?

        What you just described is so common for INFJs that it’s almost like a “Hello, my name is” sticker.

        Like

    1. “good at remembering faces, but terrible at remembering names”

      I’m not bad at either but the longer I teach the more problems I have in combining them… that is I recognize names on emails or other messages but I can’t remember what they look like or I see them and recognize them but can’t put my finger on their name….

      Occasionally a former student recognizes me and approaches and we have to talk for a couple of minutes before I remember them…
      me: “Oh yes, now I remember, you were studying Arabic… what are you doing now?”
      student: “Actually I live and work in China now, I’m just here for vacation”
      (more or less an actual conversation I had once)

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.