Perfume for Babies

When I saw this perfume for babies at Zara, I was flabbergasted. Nothing smells better than a baby. What kind of a weird person pours perfume on a tiny child??

10 thoughts on “Perfume for Babies”

  1. I feel bad whenever I see earlings on baby girls. Both at the pressure to gender identify the kid “right” from a cradle and since it’s a health risk, even if a small one. One adult woman acquaintance had to remove via surgery lumps (?) from her ears twice because of earlings. Not for everybody it ends well. Also it’s a health hazard in a kindergarten. What if another child will pull this earling together with the ear?

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  2. Well, there is no time to soon to get someone hooked up on a lifetime full of makeup and stuff. I wonder if they are running any ads for this kind of perfume ?

    Also, unlike you, I never had the opportunity to take a good sniff at a baby.

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  3. Clean healthy babies smell awesome. Dirty babies who need a nappy change, or a spit cloth do not — even though they don’t have the funkiness of adults.

    Although, maybe people will try to bottle “baby smell” as a perfume? Babies don’t really need perfume and their noses are more sensitive than adults.

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  4. I laughed out loud when I saw this post because my culture’s use of perfume on babies is an ongoing topic of conversation with my partner. She doesn’t get it either, although she accepts that I will want to put a little bit of perfume on our own future child once in a while.

    Cubans and Cuban-Americans often put just a dab of baby cologne after a bath on their baby’s head. Para mi bebé and Augustin Reyes Agua de Violetas are two old, popular brands. I’m pretty sure that Puerto Ricans and Dominicans use baby perfume too. Babies do smell wonderful all on their own, but the scent of baby mixed with these light colognes is like a Proustian Madeleine for me, reminding me of my childhood and my siblings when the were babies.

    I am a woman and a feminist, and I am especially drawn to perfumes of all types. I am low maintenance, dress to be comfortable, and wear orthopedic sneakers everywhere, but I love wearing perfume and catching whiffs of complex smells throughout the day, as I smell other people’s perfumes. I have a hyper-sensitive nose, so I’m especially vulnerable to nasty scents too, which perhaps has heightened my appreciation of sweet scents.

    I know that most perfumes out there are artificial and can be irritating to skin, just like the soap, laundry detergent, shampoo, body wash and cream we use every day. But they all smell good; essential oils sometimes smell even better. I wouldn’t continue to put a dab of perfume on my baby’s head if it had caused skin irritation. But the idea of trying it out it is dear to me, in a primal way, because I associate it so strongly with my childhood and my culture. I don’t often feel these attachments to my culture, btw, which makes the whole thing funnier.

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  5. “I know that most perfumes out there are artificial and can be irritating to skin, just like the soap, laundry detergent, shampoo, body wash and cream we use every day.”

    I always use unscented products on my little one – no point getting them hooked on artificial garbage they will be exposed to later on in life anyway. Baby powder is not recommended for use on children any longer – unscented or not.

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  6. “But the idea of trying it out it is dear to me, in a primal way, because I associate it so strongly with my childhood and my culture.”

    I associate spanking with my culture, but doesn’t mean I would follow in those footsteps. My husband’s culture suggests that baby girls need to get their ears pierced at birth, but we once again didn’t do it because it seemed too barbaric. It has been customary in the North American culture to circumcise newborns but once again parents are making different choices now. Certain things might seem cute to us especially if our elders say it’s normal, but it’s really not ok to treat our children as cute toys and do whatever we please to them.

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