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Clarissa's Blog

An academic's opinions on feminism, politics, literature, philosophy, teaching, academia, and a lot more.

The Future of Citizenship 

There are two million of Spaniards residing overseas and contributing a large chunk of money needed to keep the country afloat. They are demanding electoral reform to make it easier for them to elect representatives in Spain at all levels. 

Soon we’ll see situations where most of the people who can vote in a country reside outside it and most of those actually living in it not having the right to vote. This will make the transformation of the concept of citizenship inevitable. 

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4 thoughts on “The Future of Citizenship 

  1. it is interesting to see the dynamic of ex-pats and people living abroad voting, but a majority soon? Nah. Spains population is 47 million (voting age population probably like 34-38 million). So 2 million won’t be a majority soon…

    Is there some way 30 million people in spain will lose the right to vote?

    I suppose the only nation even close to your scenario i can think of would be israel if they never get a two state solution? They could disenfranchise the arabs / muslim population and i am not sure but feel like there is a large number with israeli citizenship abroad. what other country fits this model?

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    • \ I suppose the only nation even close to your scenario i can think of would be israel if they never get a two state solution? They could disenfranchise the arabs / muslim population

      And those Muslims will be the ones voting from abroad?

      How is “disenfranchise the arabs” connected? Those Muslims are not and will never be citizens of my nation state, whether they get a state or not.

      \ feel like there is a large number with israeli citizenship abroad. what other country fits this model?

      I do not think Israel is different from other first world small countries here.

      Also, unlike Spain, Israel is a first world country with a strong economy. Unlike many EU countries, Israeli Jewish population is rapidly growing (it includes secular Jews, not only Haredi).

      That’s why I do not see “most Jews live outside of Israel” in our future. On the contrary, the worldwide Jewish population is going down everywhere because of assimilation, except in Israel.

      It also hurts my nationalistic feelings when people go “oh, what example of a failed / failing country I can think of? Oh, got it! Israel!”
      🙂

      What must we do to stop being a Jew among nations? 🙂

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      • Spain is even more of a first world country with a strong (and rapidly growing) economy.

        Seeing the situation I described as “a failure” is your choice. It’s actually being on the forefront if an inevitable transformation. That’s hardly a failure.

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  2. Shakti on said:

    Reading this post, I immediately thought of NRIs except 1)India’s economy is growing, not collapsing, and 2)they’ve progressively restricted citizenship rights of overseas Indians.

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