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Clarissa's Blog

An academic's opinions on feminism, politics, literature, philosophy, teaching, academia, and a lot more.

EO, Part II

The best thing about the contest is that all 55 of this year’s contestants are not in the least about the degenerate philosophy of “all we want is to make MAH-NAY.” There is a social cause at the heart of each of their projects. You win because you have a project with a great cause.

EO is 100% not-for-profit and volunteer based. Imagine the logistics of organizing an event with representatives of 55 countries, including the judges, the viewers and the contestants, and you will understand the insane amount of work it involves. The contest is accompanied by all sorts of events and activities for the contestants, so it’s not just the competition that they experience. 

There is no governmental involvement at any level that I have been able to spot. These are simply successful people who have achieved a higher level in the Maslowian hierarchy of needs and want to do something good for the world. And this is precisely what the world needs now that national governments are turning into clown shows and retreating from doing anything valuable for people.

And by the way, shame on us, academics, that we have nothing of the kind for young scholars all over the world. As I discovered in my mentorship experience this year, young academics from developing countries are desperate for the most basic kind of help that we could easily provide to them, facilitating their access to first-world academia. There are some very basic things they simply don’t know and could find out easily if somebody were willing to offer help.

All of our empty blabber about how we are into diversity and against racism and sexism is worthless because we do nothing to help budding academics from the rest of the world join our closed membership club of academics. To think that an organization of business people is better at inclusion and diversity than we are! Shame on us.

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2 thoughts on “EO, Part II

  1. The Science talent search does this for budding young scientists.

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    • In my profession, even the richest academics, the ones making $250,000 do absolutely nothing whatsoever. Actually, the richer they are, the least they do.

      And by the way, I don’t know about other administrations, but the Obama administration actively encouraged them in egregious activities that bordered on the offensive.

      Like

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