The Daughter of Revolutionaries, Part I

I just finished the book titled The Daughter of Revolutionaries by Laurence Debray. She’s the daughter of Régis Debray, a French guy who was arrested in Bolivia in the 1960s for hanging out with Che Guevara during his final attempt to organize a revolution among the indigenous peasants. The indigenous peasants gladly handed Che over to the military to be killed, and after reading this book it’s crystal clear why. This Debray fellow is annoying as fuck, and the indigenous peasants must have been horrified to see such individuals try to teach them what’s right.

Régis Debray is one of those revolutionaries who come from extremely rich and well-connected families. Which is actually the only kind of sincere revolutionaries that exist. When he was arrested in Bolivia, his mommy started writing letters to the Pope and General de Gaulle, demanding they force Bolivians to release her baby. Of course, de Gaulle couldn’t refuse. In the meantime, the mommy traveled all the way to Bolivia and made the entire French diplomatic service run circles around her and her incarcerated son to make sure she could send him foie gras in jail. Bolivian jail. Foie gras. Yeah, they are those kind of people.

2 thoughts on “The Daughter of Revolutionaries, Part I”

  1. Régis Debray is one of those revolutionaries who come from extremely rich and well-connected families. Which is actually the only kind of sincere revolutionaries that exist.
    Why are these the only kind of sincere revolutionaries that exist?

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    1. When I was an undergrad, a group of people invited me to go to a WTO protest. I couldn’t because I had a job, school, and I teenager at home whom I couldn’t just leave overnight. The group’s members told me I was a corporate drone.

      They were all from extremely wealthy families and worrying about paying the rent if you lose your crappy, minimum-wage job wasn’t something they could comprehend. They cared deeply about workers in theory but were stumped when they actually met one.

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