Unforgiving

Alex Berenson is explaining how to talk to well-meaning but confused acquaintances about COVID vaccines. Or, rather, how not to do it:

Don’t overwhelm them with detail. Marek’s disease, antibody-dependent-enhancement risk, healthy vaccine user bias, age stratification, clinical trial design manipulation, unadjusted confounders, declining titers, B-cell maturation, booster schedules, anti-idiotype antibodies, spike protein migration, vaccine induced thrombotic thrombocytopenia – don’t go there.

Unreported Truths.

The scary part is that I know exactly what each term means and can hold forth on each for at least 15 minutes with numbers, graphs, and a bibliography. I could have used that brain space for something more relevant to my interests and professional pursuits but no, I have to remember the extraordinarily boring (to me) shit about spike protein migration and declining titers. Because I wasn’t given a choice.

This is one of several reasons I will never vote for anybody who runs for any office as a Democrat for as long as I shall live. I didn’t want to learn about ADE but I was forced to against my will. This cannot be forgiven.

Berenson’s Substack is here.

6 thoughts on “Unforgiving

  1. Already did the thromobocytopenia bit with sepsis a long while back.

    Not a huge fan.

    I’m surprised they don’t have advertisements on TV now for Bell’s palsy.

    They’ve covered Peyronie’s disease with a pile of curvature adjusted carrots and a Web site with a harmless sounding name that you don’t want to repeat to children. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. The logic behind Alex Berenson’s post is so poor only a journalist could have written it.

    Cases are up, but hospitalization’s are way down, as in 50% what they were last year. As I’ve been saying all along, number of cases don’t matter, what matters is hospitalizations. By this most important metric, vaccines have been very successful even if they weren’t the silver bullet we all wished they were.

    Like

    1. If people weren’t fired and locked up for refusing to participate in these very modestly successful vaccines, then nobody would care that they aren’t that good. But to pump trillions of public money to Pfizer, destroying the economy, create a once-in-a-generation inflation, deprive thousands of people of their livelihood – and for what? To somewhat reduce hospitalizations?

      I went to the gas station and the grocery store today. The prices are ridiculous because that’s how we pay for the “free vaccines.” It didn’t feel very successful to me that I’m being robbed to enrich some bastard at Pfizer when the numbers are still bad.

      Liked by 2 people

    2. “Cases are up, but hospitalization’s are way down, as in 50% what they were last year. As I’ve been saying all along, number of cases don’t matter, what matters is hospitalizations. By this most important metric, vaccines have been very successful even if they weren’t the silver bullet we all wished they were.”

      Respectfully, that argument only works if both detection and non-vaccine treatment are unchanged before and after the vaccine, which they are not.

      The correct figure to look at would be the number of deaths and cases of long term complications, which again would be confounded by superior treatment options.

      In my opinion the vaccines are, at this stage, doing more harm than good.

      Liked by 2 people

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