Acknowledge the Steal

Everything we have been saying about the stolen election has now been fully recognized by the people who stole it.

Read the article fast. It’s a little too sincere and is likely to be quietly erased.

41 thoughts on “Acknowledge the Steal

  1. I read the article. What do you think of “former GOP Representative Zach Wamp, a Trump supporter who helped coordinate a bipartisan election-protection council” and of

    // “The 22 Democrats and 22 Republicans on the National Council on Election Integrity met on Zoom at least once a week. … “We had rabid Trump supporters who agreed to serve on the council based on the idea that this is honest” //

    ?

    Were all those Trump supporters gullible fools helping Democrats to steal the election?

    Are there no people in USA who truly care more about election integrity than about a single partisan victory? If they do exist, why wouldn’t they join those efforts in good faith and be the first to report on any dishonest tactics, had they seen them?

    I do not believe you and your blog’s readers are unique in our ability to recognize that winning has worth only as long as the system is recognized as honest. A stolen victory destroys the basis on which everything stands, the legitimacy which produces the value of victory in the first place.

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    1. What could those “rabid supporters” do against Google and Facebook? Once surveillance capitalism picks a side, who can possibly win against them?

      As for reporting the dishonest tactics. Report them where? How do you report anything if the owners of all the media where information can be shared are batting for the other side? One of the oldest newspapers in the US was deplatformed and shut out of the online space for reporting a story that negatively reflected on the oligarchy’s candidate. His opponent was censored on every platform.

      Google and Facebook decide elections today. I don’t know what anybody can do now to turn this around.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Were all those Trump supporters gullible fools helping Democrats to steal the election?

      You must have skimmed over that part of the article because he says,
      “We had rabid Trump supporters who agreed to serve on the council based on the idea that this is honest,” Wamp says. This is going to be just as important, he told them, to convince the liberals when Trump wins. “Whichever way it cuts, we’re going to stick together.”

      Remember there were hordes of Democrats that believed the 2020 election had been tampered with by Russia. Establishing that Trump’s second term victory was fair and square would’ve been very important to Trump supporters who believed that most people would vote for Trump. Maybe they felt the election system in 2016 was unfairly maligned and this was their chance to reaffirm the legitimacy of the system. Trump really shot himself in the fucking foot repeatedly.

      Like

  2. I have seen a very good, thought provoking post (unfortunately, in Russian) by Бабченко. Usually, he writes things I already know and often sounds hysterical (?) , over the top in his efforts.

    Yet, here he makes one reconsider the meaning of Navalny’s hypothetical victory, using the example of Myanmar (Burma) and Aung San Suu Kyi .

    Мьянма не бутерброд
    https://starshinazapasa.livejournal.com/1278671.html

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  3. Memory hole? What memory hole?

    The Republicans who voted to overturn the election: Reuters asked the 147 lawmakers who voted to overturn the U.S. election if they believed Donald Trump lost the presidency because of election fraud. Most dodged the question.

    …Reuters asked the office of every lawmaker who voted against the certification of Electoral College results the same yes-or-no question: Do you believe that Donald Trump lost the election because of voter fraud?

    Fully 133 lawmakers of those lawmakers, or 90%, either declined to answer or did not respond to repeated inquiries. They include the two senators who led the coalition of objectors – Ted Cruz and Josh Hawley – as well as Rep. Mo Brooks of Alabama, one of the most strident backers of Trump’s bid to overturn the election….

    In a Dec. 30 statement, Hawley said some states, particularly Pennsylvania, failed to follow their own state election laws, an argument multiple courts had already rejected. “At the very least, Congress should investigate allegations of voter fraud and adopt measures to secure the integrity of our elections.”
    But he later told CNN: “I was very clear from the beginning that I was never attempting to overturn the election.”
    Hawley’s office did not respond to repeated inquiries into whether he believed Trump lost because of voter fraud.

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    1. People are terrified to say anything on the subject because people like you support the domestic Patriot Act. What’s the big gotcha here? That the oligarchy you so passionately support scared everybody into silence? Yes, they are very successful. Congratulations.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. If you actually read the article, you would know that not “everybody” backtracked and there are reps who still say that election fraud cost Trump the election. Four profiles in courage!

        As for the others? They could be terrified. Or they just want to fund their reelection campaigns off outrage. It’s hard to say.

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        1. What’s hard to say? That everybody who departs from the party line your favorite oligarchs push has been deplatformed and hounded?

          As for exploiting cheap outrage, did you vote for Biden because you love his program or because you’ve been manipulated by the Google outrage industry? I’m waiting for some self-awareness to kick in but that seems an impossible dream.

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          1. The WH press secretary declared yesterday that even after everybody gets vaccinated, masks and social distancing won’t go away. The gas is up to 2,60 from 1,85. And the people who brought us all this are feeling self-righteous because Trump.

            A friend’s son-in-law is now going to be deported and will probably die thanks to the idiot Biden. She knows that but says it’s still good he was elected because Trump. People are total robots. Now information can break through the programming.

            Liked by 1 person

  4. It’s funny how closely Podhorzer reminds me of Dominic Cummings, considered the architect of Brexit and hence a thoroughly reviled figure by the Left for “poisoning politics” and “subverting the will of the people”.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Had a quick read. It’s a false narrative. In my experience their intention is to repeat versions of it until the people who talk about observers being locked out of count rooms or voting machines being hacked etc sound like kooks.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Of course, it’s a piece of propaganda. Absolutely. The reason why I posted is because now even completely propagandistic journalists openly acknowledge that the digital oligarchy did engineer the changes in the voting laws to favor Democrats. The put the spin of “it was necessary to do this to save democracy” but they don’t even deny it.

      This means they are convinced their power is absolute.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Wow. It’s fascinating that we’ve now moved from denying everything, to crowing about it. Guess they’re feeling confident about the takeover, now that the court challenges have all shuffled offstage.

        Liked by 1 person

          1. We can hope. But where I see this going is: they’re convinced they have absolute power now. If they manage to also convince a significant chunk of the opposition, well… what’s the point of the democratic process anymore? After that, it’s all pitchforks and torches. The tacit agreement in any game is that everybody plays by the same rules, and even if you don’t win this round, you at least have a shot at winning the next round. Once it’s clear that one player has a lock on winning, everyone else stops playing. Or turns over the board. Or goes out for a smoke and comes back and shoots that guy, depending on what game you’re playing, and with whom.

            America’s been the best game going for a long time. I hate to see it end this way.

            Liked by 2 people

            1. I don’t think this will be solved democratically at this point. I think we have to wait for a couple of oligarchs to rise to power who will not be inclined to bat for the Democrats. A gigantic amount of squealing will ensue. And that’s when we might see people awakening to what they had done and trying to undo it.

              For now, it’s useless. They think “we are winning and that’s evidence that everything is good.” There needs to be a reason for them to suspect that the rigged system won’t always be rigged in their favor.

              Liked by 1 person

              1. “I don’t think this will be solved democratically at this point. I think we have to wait for a couple of oligarchs to rise to power who will not be inclined to bat for the Democrats. A gigantic amount of squealing will ensue. And that’s when we might see people awakening to what they had done and trying to undo it.”

                The oligarchs have already risen and aren’t batting for anyone but themselves. They’re absorbing money and power and will continue to do so until they can’t anymore. Civil war in the US is locked in, with the only question being when, and what sets it off.

                Liked by 1 person

              2. Everybody agrees, though. You need disagreement for a civil conflict. And this is a society of a totalitarian-type consensus. Who’s going to fight?

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              3. @JustGeorge: I am not able to reply directly to your post from 12:53 pm, but I am interested to know what you think about the situation in EU. They seem to be undergoing a similar change with all the pandemic lockdowns in place and a lot of unrest, with the lockdowns, testing and tracing being even stricter than in the US at this point, but with the difference of no obvious election fraud and the fact that the major tech companies are based in the US. Is there a hope of a good outcome in EU at this point, or are they too far gone and are going to rise and fall with the US?

                Liked by 1 person

              4. In the EU they have protests. So there are enough people who are opposed. Where are the protests in the US? Other than the pro-austerity BLMers, where’s protest, opposition, anything? Everybody agrees. Everybody is happy.

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              5. “Everybody agrees, though. You need disagreement for a civil conflict. And this is a society of a totalitarian-type consensus. Who’s going to fight?”

                From my point of observation, in the end it’ll most probably be the religious, the constitutionalists, and the disaffected fighting against the oligarchs, the technocrats, and those ideologically inclined to join the latter (ie ideological communists/socialists).

                Also I don’t see any totalitarian-type consensus in the US. There are people and groups reaching for more power and squashing opponents in an authoritarian way with some uniformity of agreement amongst the so-called “elite” and their hangers-on, sure, but hardly totalitarian, and certainly not national consensus.

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              6. My feelings on EU are mixed. Yes, there are protests and some of them are quite big. Just this past Sunday there were big protests in Vienna and Prague and that gives me hope. You can also see progressively smaller amount of people wearing masks at these protests as the time goes on. But in other countries, people are apathetic. The lockdowns and other policies are progressively getting worse. In at least some of the member states, even elementary schools are now completely closed and people have not been able to worship in churches since the beginning of December. I was always very optimistic about the EU, but at this point I think it is best for it to fall apart. All the advantages due to freedom of movement are at this point gone anyway.

                Regarding the opposition in the US, there was definitely more on the beginning of the pandemic. In the state where I live there were several protests against the lockdowns in front of the state capitol. As the time went on and multiple arrests happened, the opposition fizzled. The January 6 event in DC also served as a big deterrent. The remaining protests (if any) are small and disorganized. BTW, on the Inauguration Day, we were told we do not have to show up to work out of fear of unrest and I even got an email from my child’s daycare telling me it is okay not to bring them in as a safety precaution. Of course, nothing happened. For all the talk of insurrection in the US, there is essentially no opposition.

                Liked by 1 person

              7. Exactly, there’s no opposition in the US. If months of unchecked riots and a stolen election brought absolutely nothing but a few hours of LARPing from a tiny crowd, what civil unrest are we talking about? People’s businesses close, their kids get depressed and suicidal but nobody makes a peep.

                It’s what it is.

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              8. “I am not able to reply directly to your post from 12:53 pm, but I am interested to know what you think about the situation in EU. They seem to be undergoing a similar change with all the pandemic lockdowns in place and a lot of unrest, with the lockdowns, testing and tracing being even stricter than in the US at this point, but with the difference of no obvious election fraud and the fact that the major tech companies are based in the US. Is there a hope of a good outcome in EU at this point, or are they too far gone and are going to rise and fall with the US?”

                I’m not sure what qualifies me to answer this question, so please accept my answer as being the opinion of a regular if somewhat more than typically informed person than any expert or something.

                I don’t think that very much is going to change in the EU overall as a result of the pandemic except that the economic, social, and demographic decline that began a long time ago will proceed a little faster. Long term, I am certain that the EU will dissolve, but not now, and probably not for quite some time barring some major unexpected event.

                The EU is different from the US in that the EU is primarily an economic union, which means that the economy goes bad before dangerous things happen in politics. In the US, it’s the other way around. Since the US is primarily a political union, it means that the politics have to go bad before dangerous things happen in the economy.

                At the moment, as ugly as things look in the EU, the economy isn’t doing badly enough to give rise to a dangerous political situation. No nation is really screaming that they are going to leave the union because of COVID. People are dying, but they always die in the EU. Medical systems are overwhelmed, but they’re always overwhelmed in the EU. Money is moving around – if more sluggishly than usual – from government stimulus, inheritances from elderly deceased, emergency banking regulations (or speculation about), and industry adaptation etc

                Since the pandemic affected all European nations at the same time, they’ve all started borrowing money at once, which if anything is stabilising in the short term because politicians can shift their focus towards sprinkling borrowed money around inside their own nations (and helping their oligarchic friends steal it) while implementing draconian laws to do with surveillance, censorship, movement limitations etc.

                At some point in future though, the borrowed money in the EU will stop and be replaced by higher taxes, which will cause internal problems as national economies begin to suffer, followed by politicians turning externally towards the other nations in the EU, which will probably cause a repeat of the previous banking crisis – especially since the countries in the South were the focus of the crisis last time and are also the most heavily affected tourist wise by the pandemic, which might result in a dangerous political situation and at some point dissolution. But there isn’t enough data or any overarching reason to think that will happen just yet or even soon.

                The EU currency isn’t really at risk since every nation on the planet is printing money fast, while there aren’t really any political forces in existence with reason enough to really skyrocket – as populism would skyrocket even more if the economy was in greater crisis – for anyone to think any more about the COVID demonstrations than they did the yellow vest movement or something.

                So, I think that the EU will experience neither overly good nor overly bad outcome compared to normal, and so will generally just lurch along like the big horrible nasty thing that it is, and as you said, generally sway up and down with the US due to the mostly globalised financial system.

                As for the EU being far gone, the best way that I can answer that is to say that it was too far gone the moment it came into existence, because it makes no sense to bind nations together in a primarily economic way and then expect that they will get along politically forever. That’s just crazy. Every kind of economic school of thought, whether Keynsian, Austrian, or modern accepts that there are economic cycles that rise and fall – sometimes by a lot – which means that the architects of the EU locked every nation in Europe into a union that gave rise to political problems every time the economy went up or down…when all the economy ever does is go up and down. Idiots.

                At least in the US, the territories that make it up are primarily bound politically, so no matter what the economy is doing or what disaster is happening, everyone in the US is not only bound together by national identity & ideology, but the bonds get tighter between Americans the worse things get.

                This post is a bit too long for me to continue, but I’ll quickly mention that the US is in the worse position between the two at the moment because a small number of people in the US have seized political power and are using that power to change things to do with national identity & ideology. Compared to that, the pandemic is nothing.

                As per the previous paragraph, bonds of identity and ideology become tighter between Americans when there is a crisis or disaster, but if the crisis comes from a change in identity & ideology, there is no longer anything drawing Americans together. The opposite will happen, with the crisis driving everyone apart by reminding them how different they all are and that the political problems of the day are because of other (enemy) Americans.

                After that, if history serves, the different population groups in the US fall by default to the next unifying identity & ideology, which means that Americans will join together by race, religion, and/or class, followed by civil conflict.

                Liked by 1 person

              9. Thank you @JustGeorge for taking the time to reply to my question. I find your opinions interesting in general (although I may not always agree with them), and I was curious about your take on the situation. I think you are right with EU being in a little better situation at this point, although things are messed up in a different way over there than in the US.

                Talking about the origins of EU, one of the things I find very curious about the beginnings of EU is the involvement of Habsburgs. Whether it was out of opportunism or some kind of sincere belief is hard to say.

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              10. @ random reader:

                “Thank you @JustGeorge for taking the time to reply to my question. I find your opinions interesting in general (although I may not always agree with them), and I was curious about your take on the situation.”

                Thats a nice thing to say, so thankyou. Also I don’t mind at all when people don’t agree so long as they tell me why, because I don’t know everything and benefit as much as everyone else from the thoughts of others.

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      2. @clarissa I read a comment on the Time article elsewhere that suggested the content of the article had changed – that some of the more egregious actions were softened. I wonder if you’ve gone back to it and agree it has changed.

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        1. The most scandalous part is this: “a well-funded cabal of powerful people, ranging across industries and ideologies, working together behind the scenes to influence perceptions, change rules and laws, steer media coverage and control the flow of information” and it’s still there.

          They know that only the complete sheep don’t see that the election was stolen, so now they are trying to find a cute narrative that explains the steal away and normalizes it.

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    1. Several years ago I watched a TV series called Continuum where the premise was that a terrorist group traveled back in time to stop corporations from replacing the governments. I remember thinking – what a far-fetched idea, there is no way corporations could do that. I guess that’s why they call it sci-fi! It turns out it was not so crazy (minus the time travel part, of course).

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        1. If that makes you feel any better, at times I think I am crazy right now. I cannot believe all of this is happening and at the same time, I cannot believe I have missed very obvious signs over the past few years. I also cannot believe that so many people are not seeing what is right under our collective noses. The level of denial after a year of being subjected to this is astounding. People still think the return to normal is right around the corner.

          I have seen the end of one totalitarian regime and now I am seeing the (potential?) beginning of another one. The 30+ years in between were good while they lasted. That being said, I still keep hoping I am wrong about everything. Thank you for your blog and I am looking forward to reading your new book.

          Liked by 2 people

          1. I would be certifiably nuts if I couldn’t come to this blog and confirm that people like you still exist and see what’s happening. I’m very glad I don’t have to be alone with it.

            Liked by 1 person

          2. I feel exactly the same way. People around me are acting as if we are going back to normal in a couple of months, while everything remains closed. I don’t know how they can.

            Liked by 1 person

    2. That might explain why Bill Gates is buying all the land. United States of Microsoft within the USA might be a way to clear the DC swamp as the services of politicians will become redundant to the tech oligarchy, but who knows what kind of denatured mess they will create within their innovation “Zions”.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. We’ve now gotten to a place where the left can openly crow about tactics which, were the right to attempt or be accused of attempting anything remotely similar, would have these same people screaming from the rooftops about “intimidation tactics” and “election interference.”

    Liked by 3 people

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